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Naval – Military

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  • The Proud Admiral – 19th Century Oil on Board

    The Proud Admiral – 19th Century Oil on Board

    A good sized oil painting 60cm by 47cm for the artwork.

    A traditional 19th Century Naval pose of an Admiral, likely French, resting on his eye glass looking rather vaguely out at sea. Wearing his full naval regalia.

    Painted on board, artist unknown. The oils showing a lot of craquelure. Mounted in a simple gilt frame.

    Admiral contemplating his achievemenets!

    $690.00

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  • The Battle of Lake Champlain (Plattsburgh), and The Battle of Fort McHenry (Baltimore) – The Boston Messenger – 7th October 1814

    The Battle of Lake Champlain (Plattsburgh), and The Battle of Fort McHenry (Baltimore) – The Boston Messenger – 7th October 1814

    An original four page broadsheet … the Boston Messenger published on the 7th October 1812 at the culmination of the War of 1812 between The USA and Britain and its allies.

    Over 150 column inches (half the paper) devoted to reports, commentary and tributes, from both sides, regarding these important battles.

    The Battle of Lake Champlain (Also known as the Battle of Plattsburgh) ended the invasion of the northern states of the USA during the War of 1812. The British army under General Prevost and the Royal Navy under Downie converged on the lakeside town of Plattsburgh which was defended by New York and Vermont militia and detachments of regular troops under General Macomb and ships under Macdonough. The British attacked after dawn on the 11th September 1814 but were defeated after a hard fight in which Downie was killed. Prevost retreated to Canada.

    The Battle of Fort McHenry (Also known as the Battle of Baltimore, Maryland) inspired Francis Scott Key to write the “Star Spangled Banner” as he was watching the battle from a British ship! This battle the turning point when US forces warded off a British invasion of the sea port of Baltimore. The British had landed 5,000 troops who first found resistance at the Battle of North Point, some five miles from the city. General Sticker commanding a group of Maryland militia blunted the British attack killing General Ross in command. They were halted. Meanwhile at Fort McHenry 1,000 American soldiers awaited the British bombardment. They had protected the harbour by sinking a line of merchant ships. The attack began on 13th September 1814 using mortars and rockets. The pounding was relentless although inaccurate and little damage was sustained. British Admiral Cochrane decided on a commando style assault in an attempt to distract the American troops. However, it failed and from there the British gave up any hope of success and retreated on 14th September 1814.

    Whilst all this was happening peace negotiations were underway in Europe, also noted in this edition. A Treaty was soon signed to end the war on the basis that prior territories were retained.

    Significant Reports the War of 1812

    $90.00

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  • A Bibliography of the Works Written and Published by David Steel and His Successors – Marion Witt

    A Bibliography of the Works Written and Published by David Steel and His Successors – Marion Witt

    One of the Greenwich Maritime Monographs. Limited to 525 copies and published in 1991.

    Written by Mario M. Witt noted expert of the raft of magnificent and now rare publications of 18th century expert all things Naval, David Steel. Introductory notes on the great man’s background and life are followed by a catalogue of publications; charts; pilots and sailing direction and unusually “items of uncertain provenance”. All followed by where things can be found and how they all fit in chronologically.

    A now rare and useful summary and better than any search engine.

    $50.00

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  • Unique Naval Item – Manuscript Letter of 1820 from Captain Henry Duncan (Son of Admiral Lord Duncan) on the Royal George to Viscount Melville (First Lord of the Admiralty) applying for the Royal Yacht

    Unique Naval Item – Manuscript Letter of 1820 from Captain Henry Duncan (Son of Admiral Lord Duncan) on the Royal George to Viscount Melville (First Lord of the Admiralty) applying for the Royal Yacht

    Two pages then folded in three marked for despatch
    Captain H Duncan
    12 Dec 1820
    Royal George
    —————————————————————–

    Addressed at the foot of page 1 … The Viscount Melville …….
    Dover December 12 1820
    My Lord
    Under an idea that the King nominates the Captain to command his Yacht and having in remembrance the very great condescension of His Majesty to me, when I had the honour of being attached to the Royal Squadron, I feel that if no one above me in the list was preferred, His Majesty might probably be pleased not to pass me over were my name brought before him – but I should not attempt to have this done except thro (ugh) the first Lord of the Admiralty. I have no claims of my own to advance. I trust I have done my duty when occasion has offered, more I do not pretend to, but I hope I may not be deemed presumptuous in supposing that if the King has any of those feelings towards me which he formerly graciously expressed, I shall not stand the less high in His Majesty’s favour because I am the son of Lord Duncan, and I further myself that your Lordship may think this a reason to entitle me to your favourable recommendation –
    I have the honour to be your Lordships Most Obedient
    Henry Duncan
    ————————————————————————————
    Melville’s reply is written clearly overlaid on the second page at right angles to the underlying content
    “I received your letter applying for the vacant yacht and you will learn that the officer I have selected for recommendation to the Yacht is one much senior to yourself”

    $190.00

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  • Badges and Insignia of World War II: Air Force, Naval, Marine – Guido Rosignoli

    Badges and Insignia of World War II: Air Force, Naval, Marine – Guido Rosignoli

    Published 1983 Peerage Books , 363 pages in very good condition with very good dust jacket.

    Badges and insignia, the heraldry of the services, here outline with fascinating insight into their varied and complex functions.

    Over 2,500 colour illustrations and informative text provide an excellent tome for both the collector and novice.

    $30.00

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  • Massacre at Tobruk – Peter smith

    Massacre at Tobruk – Peter smith

    Published by KimberLondon 1987 a very good copy in a fine dust jacket.

    What went wrong at Tobruk – so much was staked and lost. This book provides a clear well illustrated record.

    Tobruk an honest assessment

    $50.00

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