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  • Fine Carte de Visite – Sir George Henry Richards – Hydrographer to the Navy and Surveyor of British Columbia, Canada – Distinguished photographer Ernest Edwards. Circa 1865.

    Fine Carte de Visite – Sir George Henry Richards – Hydrographer to the Navy and Surveyor of British Columbia, Canada – Distinguished photographer Ernest Edwards. Circa 1865.

    George Henry Richards (1820-1896) was born in Cornwall and joined the Navy in 1832. He served in Australia, New Zealand, South America and the during the First Opium War in China. He was second in command on Belcher’s ship Assistance in the search for Sir John Franklin. In 1856 he was given the command of the survey vessel Plumper and sent to the north-west Pacific to assist in the boundary negotiation with the Americans. His survey efforts were magnificent and the regional map is covered in placenames originated by Richards. He returned to England in 1864 and was made Hydrographer to the Navy. Our carte de visite was likely made soon afterwards as the photographer completed a project regarding Prominent Men of Eminence … which included also Darwin and Lyell.

    The photographer Ernest Edwards (1837-1903) was, as shown on this example, working out of 30 Baker Street, London in the 1860’s. In 1869 he invented is own collotype process which he called heliotype. This example is a two tone use of collotype (you can really only tell the difference for sure under a microscope).

    Size 4.1 inches by 2.5 inches in the old system (standard for a CDV)… beautiful condition.

    Important photographic image of the leading Naval Surveyor and Mapmaker of British Columbia, George Henry Richards by accomplished Victorian photographer Ernest Edwards.

    $80.00

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  • The Founding of Hobart 1803-1804 – Frank Bolt

    The Founding of Hobart 1803-1804 – Frank Bolt

    The author of this fine book, Frank Bolt, was surprised that he could not find any book on the very early period of the settlement of Hobart. So he carried out his own research and effectively self published this work.

    Large octavo, 320 pages, illustrated, with folding plan, printed to a high standard. A first edition 2004 and in as new condition.

    An unusual work in structure … Bolt explain his approach well in the lengthy Preface. Having assembled all of the exiting evidence his challenge was how to present it … landing on the idea of creating a faux diary of events on a nearly day by day basis. It work very well. After a further introductory “Prologue” the diary runs from page 38 through to page 279. Within this there are separate brief “cut-aways” regarding the “difference between the initial Risdon Settlement and the final Settlement at Sullivan’s Cove and “the Cargo of the Collin’s Expedition”.

    Notes on Sources are kept until the end and are extensive and useful as well is a list of the Pioneers of Hobart Town. And Meehan’s Plan of circa 1811.

    “The Book” on the first days of Hobart

    $80.00

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  • George Bass – Discovery of the Bass Strait  – Silver Commemorative Medal – 1968

    George Bass – Discovery of the Bass Strait – Silver Commemorative Medal – 1968

    George Bass, Surgeon an Explorer carried out two voyages to confirm the Bass Strait and the separation of Tasmania (then Van Diemen’s Land) from mainland Australia – known affectionately in Tasmania as “The Other Island”.

    In 1797 he set off in an open whaleboat with a crew of six. They sailed to Cape Howe at the farthest point of South-east Australia and, from there sailed west along the Gippsland coast to Western Point, at the entrance to Port Phillip. Observations of the rapid tide and long south-western swell supported his view that a large Strait lay in front of him.

    In 1798 he set out again, with Matthew Flinders in the sloop Norfolk and circumnavigated Van Diemen’s Land. They visited the Derwent River which had previously been named by Captain John Hayes. On return to Sydney, Flinders promoted the naming of the Strait after Bass … the then Governor, John Hunter agreed.

    Bass’s later life was adventurous and … likely …tragic, making the date of his death on the medal questionable.

    The medal was struck in 1968. It was produced by K.G. Luke & Sons, Melbourne for the Numismatic Association of Victoria. 160 example were produced in bronze and a similar number in silver. This one is identified as number B4.

    50mm in diameter with a high relief bust of Bass facing right, carrying his spyglass. On the reverse a delightful image of the whaleboat, the sloop Norfolk an the chart and route of the vessels, appropriately date.

    Unusual medal celebrates the achievements of George Bass – the prestigious silver example.

    $280.00

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  • Tasman’s Journal  – Abel Janszoon Tasman’s Journal of His Discovery of Van Diemen’s Land and New Zealand in 1642, …

    Tasman’s Journal – Abel Janszoon Tasman’s Journal of His Discovery of Van Diemen’s Land and New Zealand in 1642, …

    … with documents relating to his exploration of Australia in 1644. Being photo-lithographic facsimiles pf the original manuscript in the Colonial Archives at the Hague with an English translation and facsimiles of original maps to which are added life and labours of Abel Janszoon Tasman by J.E. Heeres LL.D Professor at the Dutch Colonial Institute Delft by Dr W Van Bemmelen assistant-director of the Royal Meteorological Institute Utrecht

    Reprinted in facsimile, Los Angeles, 1965 by N. A. Kovach. Edited by Frederik Muller.

    Large folio (44cm by 29cm) of Tasman’s illustrated journal with an English translation and five folding maps in an end pocket. Complete and in fine condition.

    Because the book is so large and we prefer to use an A3 scanner we are having difficulty getting good images. Here are some, … more to come when the technical department get around to it …

    Commences after preliminaries with a 195-page facsimile of the original journal, including all illustrations. Followed by a 57-page English translation. Then “His Life and Labours” 162 pages which covers .. The Dutch Chartered East India Company; Tasman’s birthplace, early life, marriage, departure for India; Appointed skipper (1634) in Amboyna; voyage of discovery east of Japan (1639); Dutch in Formosa, Tasman’s return to Batavia (1640); voyage to Palembang (1642); Sources of knowledge re Tasman’s voyages to the South=land (1642-1644) [Including this Journal]; Tasman’s mission to Djambi (1646), Siam (1647) and the Philippines (1648). Finally, observations on the compass on Tasman’s Voyage [this Journal] a further 21 pages.

    The folding maps in super condition are … 1. Map drawn after the map made under Tasman’s direction of his 1642/44 voyages with corrections found in contemporary documents and shown in English. 2. Expedition to Derma 1634. 3. Expedition to Japan 1639. 4 Expedition to the Philippines. 5. Isogonic chart of the Indian and Pacific Oceans for 1640 from Tasman by Van Bemmelen.

    Edition limited to 225 copies, of which 200 where available to the public … as a result scarce and collectable.

    Tasman’s Journal a rare and fine facsimile – The Discovery of Van Diemen’s Land

    $790.00

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  • The Comedians – Graham Greene – First Edition 1966

    The Comedians – Graham Greene – First Edition 1966

    First edition published by The Bodley Head, London in 1966. Octavo, 313 pages. Very good condition. First edition variant dust jacket designed by James and Ruth McCrea.

    Described as a novel, not an entertainment, if you understand the Greene definition.

    Classic Graham Greene novel based in Haiti at the time of dictator Doctor Duvalier “Papa Doc”. Greene could not return to Haiti to finish his novel because of his description of the dictator in the English press. As usual alive with characters and suspense and sometimes comedy.

    First edition Greene Classic

    $50.00

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  • “Society of Arts” Victorian Brass Microscope with Case – c1860-70

    “Society of Arts” Victorian Brass Microscope with Case – c1860-70

    A quality fully working English brass microscope from around 1860-70.

    With the early V shaped bar for rack and pinion focus and fine adjustment knurled knob. Two objectives both multiple compounding. There is also Live Box for observing creepy crawlies. The concave mirror is in very good condition. The original mahogany case is a quality box, original to the instrument and in very good condition, with separate drawer for slides and bits and pieces. The case still has its original lock and its key, often long lost. The microscope is mounted on a rectangular mahogany board which slides into the case.

    Very similar to the example presented by Peter Turner FRMS to the Royal Microscopical Society catalogued as number 92 in authority Turner.

    In the early 1850’s the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce offered a prize for the design of a compact compound microscope that could sell for 3 guineas. The design, which is reflected here, was won by Robert Fields & Son of Birmingham in 1854. Due to the popularity of the design it was copied by others but often at a higher price. These copies were often unsigned as is the case here. However, the brass foot is very much in the style of Ross so we suspect it came from that maker.

    Nice 19th Century Cased Brass Microscope..

    $640.00

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