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Religion

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  • Inscriptions in Stone – St David’s Burial Ground (Hobart) 1804-1872 – Compiled by Richard Lord

    Inscriptions in Stone – St David’s Burial Ground (Hobart) 1804-1872 – Compiled by Richard Lord

    First edition 1976. Number 215 of 1000 copies.

    Published by St David’s Battery Point in 1976. Small octavo, 210 pages, frontispiece of Robert Knopwood astride his horse with dog. Very good copy.

    A unique record of early Hobart town from the headstones of the first cemetery. Many that have visited Hobart have spent time reading the gravestones at St David’s. It is impossible not to come away with a sense of perspective on both old and modern life.

    Sadness and triumph reflected in stone and here recorded in greater depth with through research (four years in the making).

    There is nothing morbid about this book it is in fact a celebration of the first European’s to grace Tasmanian shores.

    Graveyard delight (well it’s a special one) from Hobart.

    $60.00

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  • Hanji Mahomet Allum – Afghan Camel-Driver, Herbalist and Healer in Australia – Madelaine Brunato – Very Rare

    Hanji Mahomet Allum – Afghan Camel-Driver, Herbalist and Healer in Australia – Madelaine Brunato – Very Rare

    A scarce book published by Investigator Press of Leabrook in 1972; effectively self published. Octavo, 80 pages, illustrated throughout.

    Mahomet Allum was born in Kandahar, Afghanistan about 1857. He came to Australia in the 1880’s as a camel driver, working in Western Australia mainly in and around the gold-fields. He was a true transport pioneer, carrying mail and supplies thousands of miles into the most isolated of areas. Over time he built up a reputation as a herbalist and healer. In his later years he settled in South Australia … a well known and liked colourful and controversial figure … people flocked to receive his cures. He lived until he was 106 … no wonder he became known as the “Wonder Man”

    Pasted at the front is a note on the author Madeleine Brunato who had spent time among the Mahommedan tribes of Quetta. The note is signed and annotated by the author.

    Camel driving in the Western Deserts or was it the herbs that kept him alive so long …

    $40.00

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  • A Living Voice of the Living Bush – William Ricketts – Wonderfully Annotated and Signed.

    A Living Voice of the Living Bush – William Ricketts – Wonderfully Annotated and Signed.

    First and only edition published by the Victorian Forestry Commission in 1965 celebrating the incredible art of William Ricketts. Larger format soft cover, 24 pages with sixteen colour illustrations. A bit marked and aged on the cover, clean inside, forgive any deficiencies for his manuscript additions.

    The annotation on the first blank page reads as follows … “From my Mountain of Remembrance where we remember with love everything that was created … [followed by his creation symbol underscored with his signature] … The Prayer of the Mountain – The Prayer of the Forest – My prayer – all are one Prayer … “

    Added in different hand the name of the receiver.

    William Ricketts (1898-1993) misunderstood and maybe he misunderstood … regardless he made beautiful objects. If it offends, well then that’s a bit sad. He was a religious man and felt the earth and whether he misrepresented and misplaced .. well that gives a job for the academic critics. Just enjoy them. They were badly damaged in a massive storm a couple of years ago … we hope they have been resurrected.

    In the 1950’s he spent quite some time with the Pitjantjatjara and Arrente people in Central Australia … they inspired his work among the trees in the Dandenong Mountains.

    William Ricketts – A rare annotation we believe.

    $70.00

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  • One Ceremony One Song. An Economy of Religious Knowledge Among Yolnu of North-East Arnhem Land. A PhD Thesis – Australia National University – 1978 – Ian Keen

    One Ceremony One Song. An Economy of Religious Knowledge Among Yolnu of North-East Arnhem Land. A PhD Thesis – Australia National University – 1978 – Ian Keen

    An original copy of the monumental Thesis written by Ian Keen to obtain his PhD from ANU in 1978. Keen to go on to be a respected anthropologist holding positions at Queensland University and ANU and spending time at Oxford, visiting Professor at Osaka etc.

    Perfect bound in blue cloth covered boards, gilt titles to front and spine. Typed on one side 412 pages with 19 pages of plates from the authors photographs; 72 Figures in text; 45 tables of information and 4 maps. This copy gifted to “Jimmy” clearly an associated academic with a few marginal notes etc. Over 3 kgs in weight so if Overseas a postage supplement will be necessary.

    The English born author was late to the academic world having first worked as an art restorer before doing an undergraduate degree at the University of London under Mary Douglas in his mid thirties. He did well and soon won a scholarship to work on Aboriginal religion through song symbolism in Arnhem Land, Northern Australia. This thesis demonstrates the depth of his research and provides a meticulous record of his findings.

    He commenced his work on the island of Milingimbi in 1974 and worked there for fourteen months before completing a further 10 months on the mainland at Nanggalala. Its is not surprising that “’writing up” took him some time.

    His “Abstract” explains his examination of the relationship between the organisation, ownership and content of religious practice and knowledge, marriage and power relations in Yolnu society. He argues that older men require the authority gained through their control of secret ceremonies and religious knowledge, in order to sustain a polygamous regime. Making possible a system of marriage through which some men gain many wives. Keen’s description of the various ceremonies is highly detailed … we doubt if any broadly published material covers such content with similar vigour.

    A special reference relating to the Yolnu of Northern Australia.

    $280.00

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  • Relics for the Curious – Two Volumes – 1824

    First Edition set near impossible to find. Printed by Samuel Burton Leadenhall Street, London in 1824.

    Two small volumes, 184 pages, 168 pages, frontispiece to both. Bound in contemporary olive half calf, spines gilt with double red leather labels. Lightly rubbed a pretty clean and bright set.

    A collection of most peculiar anecdotes. The Literary Magnet of the time praised the contents and demonstrated their approbation of them by making copious extracts available in their rag.

    Classifies as anecdotes, clerical, professional and miscellaneous and compounded by “singular customs” and “extracts from remarkable wills”.

    Very unusual books for the well read and broadly based historian … facts contained in here designed to liven any dull dinner party … “Did you know that …”

    Relics … well anecdotes really of some strange historical happenings.

    $180.00

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  • Snapshot from the North Pacific [British Columbia] – Rev Ridley – Edited Alice Janvrin

    Snapshot from the North Pacific [British Columbia] – Rev Ridley – Edited Alice Janvrin

    Scarce. Published by the Missionary Society, London in 1904. Octavo, viii, 192 pages, illustrated throughout.

    Essentially a travel account of Northern British Columbia from 1880 onwards by Rev Ridley who had the task of “converting” heathens indigenous and otherwise. When not doing that he travelled extensively by sea and land. His account if very interesting and the descriptions of the people he met along on the way priceless. Illustrations from early photo graph or sketches therefrom very good … we particularly like the Medicine Man and the Two Chiefs.

    Over time he covers from the ease of Vancouver Island … the Skeena River; Massett; Metlakatia in the very north; meets the Kwaguti; visits Alert Bay; Aiyansh and Kitkatia. He sails to Dolphin island to meet to the Kilkatla or Gitxaala Nation … the first native people to take up arms .. encouraged by passing English. We like these people … Gitxaala translates to “People of the Open Sea” .. there are not many of them but they are proud people … we understand that they have currently suspended Treaty negotiations with the Canadian Government … we hope it works out for them.

    Rev William Ridley religious but informed …

    $90.00

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