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Botanicals

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  • “Cowslips” – Original Multi Coloured Woodcut – by Australian born Hall Thorpe – 1922

    One for the collector. A striking example of a desirable woodcut by Australian born Hall Thorpe.

    A very good bright impression, signed in pencil below the image. Thick wove paper 27cm by 23cm, printed area 16.5cm by 15.2cm. A lovely example. Authority on Hall Thorpe, Richard King (see Voyager listing) reference no 10. This work was completed in 1922.

    Hall Thorpe (1874-1947) was born in Victoria, Australia. In the 1890’s he was apprenticed to John Fairfax as an engraver for the Sydney Mail. He was pretty good. In 1902 he moved to England and commenced further study at the Heatherly School of Art, Chelsea. He honed his skill in woodblocks holding his first one-man show in London in 1918. It was a great success and by the early 1920’s he had gained an enviable reputation for woodblock floral still life. He printed each example himself ensuring consistency and standard. Operating first from a studio in Redcliffe Square, he then moved into gallery space in South Kensington. As well as the UK they were popular in the USA and France

    Original signed Hall Thorpe Woodcut – Cowslips.

    $360.00

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  • Seven Professionally Prepared Antique Microscope Slides – Botanicals – by W. Watson

    Seven Professionally Prepared Antique Microscope Slides – Botanicals – by W. Watson

    A fine collection of antique ring mounted botanical specimens. Comprising …

    Leaf of Tea Tree
    Leaf of Aloe ferox
    Leaf of Laurel
    Leaf of Tobacco Plant
    Stem of Ribes
    Lime Tree section
    Lea bud of Ash

    Some super examples with very minimal specimen degradation as can be seen from the images.

    William Watson set up as an optician in 1837. He took up premises at 313 High Holborn, London in 1862. The business became W Watson & Sons from 1882. They took over the slide preparation business of Edmund Wheeler in 1884 and from them were to become one of the most successful preparers. These slides are circa 1900, though the Lime Tree is earlier and carries the distinctive Watson cursive style specimen label of the 1880’s.

    Note tray not included slides will be sent in protective special purpose containers.

    A good group of early quality mounts by Watson

    $140.00

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  • Ada Aurantiaca (Orchid from South America) –  Nugnet Finch for Warner 1882

    Ada Aurantiaca (Orchid from South America) – Nugnet Finch for Warner 1882

    Original hand finished lithograph printed from stone by John Nugent Finch for the illustrious Orchid Album by Warner and Moore and published by Benjamin Williams. This was from the first collection published in 1882. The work was not completed until 1887. Still regarded as the most complete and beautiful work on the spectacular orchid family.

    This beautiful orchid hails from the mountains Colombia and Ecuador. It was first described and named by Voyager hero John Lindley in the 1850’s. They grow in warm damp forests around 2,000 metres.

    A good size at 30cm x 24cm completely clean. the colours bright and enhanced with gum arabic.

    Price $120.00 unframed

    Spectacular Orchid from South America

    $120.00

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  • Choice Garden Flowers (With Twelve Beautiful Hand Coloured Plates) –  James Andrews 1847

    Choice Garden Flowers (With Twelve Beautiful Hand Coloured Plates) – James Andrews 1847

    Full title … Choice Garden Flowers their Cultivation and General Treatment in All Seasons”

    A first edition published by Houlston and Wright, London in 1847. Book not dated but some plates are. Scarce included in the Library at Kew.

    Octavo, with twelve striking hand coloured lithographed plates of “Choice Flowers”’ including roses, acacia, rhododendron, crocus, petunia, ranunculus etc.

    Original brown cloth covered boards with gilt device to front. A little loss to head of spine, all page pages gilt. A super copy for the delightful plates alone.

    Andrews a Fellow of the Horticultural Society one of the great flower illustrators of his day. He exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1868. He also did portraits and a number are included in the National Portrait Gallery, London.

    Scarce well executed botanical collection

    $290.00

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  • Shewy Stenactis  (Stenactis Speciosa) – Sarah Drake – 1833

    Shewy Stenactis (Stenactis Speciosa) – Sarah Drake – 1833

    A beautiful hand coloured engraving by Sarah Drake, published in the Piccadilly, London on 1st April 1833 by Ridgway for John Lindley. Colouring highlighted with gum Arabic which gives the impression of a rich three dimensional effect.

    John Lindley noted …The Shewy Stenactis is a hardy perennial native to California and had been brought by Mr Douglas to the London Horticultural Society.

    Very good condition the colours bright, thick paper clean 23cm x 15cm … will frame nicely.

    Sarah Drake was born in Norfolk in 1803. In 1830 she moved to the London house of John Lindley a leading botanist of the time. Among her roles she was the governess to Lindley’s children and through this Lindley spotted her superb artistic talent. She then became the principal illustrator to his botanical publications. She died in 1857. The Australian orchid genus Drakea was named in her honour.

    John Lindley was born in 1799. Early in his career he was employed by Sir Joseph Banks in his Herbarium. He was Professor of botany at the University of London and also ran the Royal Horticultural Society. In the 1830’s Kew Gardens was nearly demolished but for Lindley who had to campaign in Parliament to save it from extinction

    Price $90.00 unframed … enquire for framing options if you wish

    $90.00

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  • Spotted Gongora  (Gongora Maculata) – Sarah Drake – 1833

    Spotted Gongora (Gongora Maculata) – Sarah Drake – 1833

    Spotted Gongora (Gongora Maculata)

    A striking orchid originally found near Demerara in 1832 by Mr Thomas Moss of Otterspool. Richard Harvey of Liverpool was one of the first to cultivate it in his hothouse The flower bunches are two and a half feet long. It was named in honour of D. Antonio Caballero y Gongora, Bishop of Cordova, who whilst Archbishop of Santa Fe and Viceroy of New Grenada was a zealous promoter of all branched of Natural History.

    A beautiful hand coloured engraving by Sarah Drake for John Lindley, published in the Piccadilly, London on 1st October 1833 for John Lindley. Colouring highlighted with gum Arabic which gives the impression of a rich three dimensional effect.

    Sarah Drake was born in Norfolk in 1803. In 1830 she moved to the London house of John Lindley a leading botanist of the time. Amongst her roles she was the governess to Lindley’s children and through this Lindley spotted her superb artistic talent. She then became the principal illustrator to his botanical publications. She died in 1857. The Australian orchid genus Drakea was named in her honour.

    John Lindley was born in 1799. Early in his career he was employed by Sir Joseph Banks in his Herbarium. He was Professor of botany at the University of London and also ran the Royal Horticultural Society. In the 1830’s Kew Gardens was nearly demolished but for Lindley who had to campaign in Parliament to save it from extinction

    Price unframed … if you wish framing option please enquire ….

    $80.00

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