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Tasmania

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  • Journals of Expeditions in Van Diemen’s Land 1833 – John Charles Darke – Sullivan’s Cove Delicacy

    Journals of Expeditions in Van Diemen’s Land 1833 – John Charles Darke – Sullivan’s Cove Delicacy

    A delightful limited edition by Sullivan’s Cove published in 1985. Number 20 of 175 copies. Charming fine gift like quality. Darke’s manuscripts are held by the Tasmanian State Library. Protected in semi-translucent mylar wrap as issued .. not shown here only because it does not photograph well … everything in fine condition.

    A diminutive 43 pages Darke’s expeditions are set out in three reports … first, To the Peak of Teneriffe in 1833, second South West of the Peak and finally “Hobart Town Report”’ all dated 1833.

    There is an interesting editors note the “Peak of Teneriffe” is Wyld’s Craig and the “Derwent’ variously referred to is in fact the River Nive.

    Beautiful things often come in small packages

    Posted may well be reduced on this item ..

    $60.00

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  • Baudin in Australian Waters – Bonnemains et al

    Baudin in Australian Waters – Bonnemains et al

    A quite spectacular book on very special subject edited by Jaqueline Bonnemains, Elliot Forsyth and Bernard Smith.

    The Artwork of the French Voyage of Discovery to the Southern Lands 1800-1804.

    Large, folio production, a first edition published by the Oxford University Press, Melbourne in 1988. 347 pages beautifully illustrated and with end paper maps. Very good if not fine condition.

    With a complete descriptive catalogue of drawings and paintings of Australian subjects by Lesueur and Petit from the Lesueur Collection at the Museum d’Histoire Naturelle, Le Harve, France.

    Nicolas Baudin left Le Harve in 1800 with two vessel under his command the Naturaliste and the Geographe. Of the 238 men 22 were scientists. Their focus was the western and southern coastlines of Australia including Tasmania. They studied the habits of the aborigines and collected many natural history specimens.

    This book is a tribute to the collection of ethnological and zoological drawings and paintings resulting from the expedition. The originals are housed at Le Havre. The book contains over 300 illustrations many in colour enhancing our understanding of the true beauty of the works. The substantial introductory essays on the expedition and the biographies of the key individuals and artist set the scene nicely.

    Baudin Expedition in all its Beauty

    $190.00

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  • The Life and Labours of George Washington Walker of Hobart Town, Tasmania. By James Backhouse and Charles Taylor – First Edition 1862

    The Life and Labours of George Washington Walker of Hobart Town, Tasmania. By James Backhouse and Charles Taylor – First Edition 1862

    First edition published by A.W. Bennett, London and Thomas Ready, York in 1862. Large octavo, 556 pages with 12 page “Friendly Counsel” bound at the rear. Original ribbed cloth binding with gilt title to spine. Appears re-cased retaining the original jet black endpapers. Frontispiece of George W Walker with facsimile note and signature. Light staining off the image on the frontispiece and a few signs of ageing here and there. Manuscript note on title indication from the Library of the Doncaster Friends, possibly donated by Backhouse of you understand the geography. Overall still a good to better copy of a very interesting compilation. Essential reading on Tasmania.

    George Washington Walker (1800-1959) was a Quaker and humanitarian born the 21st child! Of John Walker. He was brought up by his grandmother in Newcastle, England. His first job as a linen draper introduced him to the Quakers and James Backhouse of York. He became active in the movement. In 1831 he accompanied James Backhouse to the Australian and South African Colonies, investigation conditions for convicts and indigenous people. They encouraged schools for the poor, temperance, cleanliness and care in hospitals generally arousing a social conscience. Walker returned to Hobart and married Sarah Mather. He set up a linen draper’s shop and from there distributed Bibles. He formed the Hobart Savings Bank to assist those at the bottom of the pile. Generally, he was well liked although his campaign to stop drinking on Sunday’s did not go down well. He worked to suppress vice at the Female Factory and kept in close touch with the Aboriginal mission stations. His eldest son James Backhouse Walker became one of our most respected historians. He spent the last two years of his life living in Narryna and was buried in West Hobart following his death on 2nd February 1859.

    The book is comprehensive … Walker arrived with Backhouse at Hobart by page 32 after having described the approaches. He meets Governor Arthur, John Leach and G.A. Robinson. Observes the Bridgewater Chain-gang the toils of their work still seen today … the exhaustion and conditions of their work hard to imagine. They visit New Norfolk and the Clyde district and come into contact with aboriginal groups. Then a major voyage to Port Davey and Macquarie Harbour. Back in Hobart visits to Richmond and then off to Flinders Island and the aboriginal settlements and the ill-treatment of aborigines. To Launceston and up to George Town and on to Circular Head, Woolnorth and Cape Grim … and much more before leaving for New South Wales and Norfolk Island. Two hundred pages are devoted to Mauritius and South Africa before Walker returns to Hobart in 1840 to live out his life much of which is dealt with by reference to his letters from that period.

    Thorough treatment of Walker’s Life and an excellent complement to “A Narrative of a Visit to the Australian Colonies” by Backhouse

    $140.00

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  • The Voyage of the Caroline from England to Van Diemen’s Land and Batavia in 1827-28 By R Hare – Edited by and with Chapters on the Early History of Northern Tasmania, Java etc by  Ida lee (Mrs Marriott)

    The Voyage of the Caroline from England to Van Diemen’s Land and Batavia in 1827-28 By R Hare – Edited by and with Chapters on the Early History of Northern Tasmania, Java etc by Ida lee (Mrs Marriott)

    Published by Longmans, London in 1927 a first edition in very good condition.

    Original blue cloth binding spine lettered in gilt. 308 pages with 24 Illustrations and 15 maps of which 8 are folding. A few pencil annotations by a scholarly hand which we feel adds to the text.

    A log of the voyage from England to Van Diemen’s Land and Batavia in 1827-28 With additional chapters on the early History of Northern Tasmania (by Ida Lee), Java, Mauritius and St Helena.

    The elements of the log/diary relating to Tasmania are most interesting … the approaches and the sighting of the Black Pyramid, named by Flinders, and the arrival at Circular Head with mixed feelings. The disappointment of most in the accommodations before them … contrasting with the Directors of the Company (The Van Diemen’s Land Company), particularly Mr Inglis in Heaven. The next day an invitation to Highfield House and the ascending of Circular Head where they found sheep and kangaroo. Quite a bit about “Life at Highfield” and the hostility of the natives.

    The second part by Ida Lee describes the discovery of Bass Strait; the formation of the Van Diemen’s Land Company; Goldie’s explorations; Jorgensen’s expeditions and that with Lorimer. Again, Highfield and Mr Hellyer’s explorations and also Fossey and her own account of the native Tasmanians.

    Important log – and very good additions with special rather unique Tasmanian content

    $160.00

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  • Thylacine – the Tragic Tale of the Tasmanian Tiger – David Owen

    Thylacine – the Tragic Tale of the Tasmanian Tiger – David Owen

    There are debates about which is the best Thylacine book which has created some crazy prices for some. This in our mind is one of the best. Published by Allen & Unwin, a first printing 2003.

    Octavo, 228 pages very well illustrated. A very good copy.

    Author David Owen did his homework and is more known for his fictional accounts set mainly in Tasmania. No fiction here unless you do not believe they may be still out there. Well we all hope so surely.

    Written essentially in chronological order starting with the evolution of the unusual marsupial to the loss of the poor creature through blind human stupidity, to depictions in art , the prospect of cloning and indeed those more recent sightings not just in Tassie but also on the mainland.

    Well written account of the Thylacine from the beginning to beyond the end – maybe?

    $35.00

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  • Expedition to the Head of the Derwent [Tasmania] – George Frankland

    Expedition to the Head of the Derwent [Tasmania] – George Frankland

    A delicious little gem from the Sullivan’s Cove published 1983 number 124 a limited edition of only 155.

    George Frankland, quite a character, and his writing suggests a man that preferred the bush to the office. Published from his original manuscript as was his covering letter to R.W. Hay which sets out his intentions.

    Limited edition Tasmanian collectable

    $60.00

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