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Classics

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  • The Fortunes of Fifi – Molly Elliot Seawell – First Edition 1903

    The Fortunes of Fifi – Molly Elliot Seawell – First Edition 1903

    A first edition published by Bobbs-Merrill, Indianapolis in 1903. Interestingly, carries the booksellers sticker of Dymock’s Book Arcae, 428 George Street. Dymocks, Australia’s favourite book store was started in 1879 but soon moved to the aforementioned address as the business took off.

    Fifi is a young actress in fourth rate theatre in Paris. Napoleon is involved in a minor way. She has confidantes and admirers and much love and lost love ensues. She turns out to be related to a certain person in very high place … things get rich and in a tangle which really she is not that thrilled with – eventually, she ends up with the one she should. Complex and intriguing romance. The outline is easily told … it became an early silent movie circa WW! And was very successful.

    Octavo, 239 pages, with decorative end papers that match the delightful pictorial covers. A very good copy.

    Classic Romance based in Paris, became one of the very first movies.

    $50.00

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  • Le Morte DArthur – The History of King Arthur and His Nobel Knights of the Round Table – Sir Thomas Malory – Illustrated with 36 coloured plates by William Russell Flint. Two Volumes Bound for Bumpas, London.

    Le Morte DArthur – The History of King Arthur and His Nobel Knights of the Round Table – Sir Thomas Malory – Illustrated with 36 coloured plates by William Russell Flint. Two Volumes Bound for Bumpas, London.

    Originally published in 1485 and first issued by the Medici Society in 1912. This is an early reprint of that issue, in two volumes, 1920 and, finely bound in full leather under the name of the legendary London bookseller Bumpas.

    Two Volumes, crown quarto, 439 and 531 pages after preliminaries in each case. Magnificent plates, 36 in total, by Russell Flint.

    The binding, full polished morocco, with raise bands and gilt lettering, and gilt fillet with inner wide dentils (a lovely touch), all page edges richly gilt. Silk ribbon markers. Some rubbing, very clean internally.

    Russell Flint’s interpretation of Malory’s work is masterful and depicts seminal moments and characters.

    Imprinted following the text of Caxton, modernised by Alfred Pollard, instructed by the Medici Society, London. Russell Flint (1880-1969) was influenced by the Pre-Raphaelite movement and, the stylised neoclassical art of the Renaissance. He attended the Edinburgh, Royal Institute of Art. He admired Arthur Rackham … and you can that in these example. His figures are finely modelled with further influences of Burne-Jones

    Le Morte DArthur – Illustrated and bound in style … a very good set

    $390.00

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  • Petronius – The Satyricon – Private Press – Norman Lindsay Illustrated – 1910

    A Revised Latin Text of the Satyricon with the Earliest English Translation (1694) Now First Reprinted with an Introduction together with One Hundred Illustrations by Norman Lindsay

    Published privately by Ralph Straus, London 1910. Folio, (33cm by 26cm), 303 pages, 100 leaves of plates.

    First English translation side by side with the Latin on alternating pages. The Satyricon, Satyricon liber (The Book of Satylike Adventures) a work of fiction by Gaius Petronius. It is and example of Menippean satire.

    Gaius Petronius Arbiter (27AD-66AD) was born in Marseille. He became a Roman Courtier in the reign of Nero. He is well mentioned by Tacitus, Plutarch and Pliny the Elder who regarded him as a “judge of elegance”. Petronius became a member of the Senatorial Class who devoted their lives to pleasure … he was essentially a fashion advisor to Nero. Sleeping by day he devoted night time to amusement … he had a reputation of being very good at it!

    In the Satyricon, Petronius uses a new style of writing in that each of the characters are well and openly described. Previously, such literature focused mainly on the plot. There is no holding back in terms of moral issues, and it is thought that the main character Trimalchio (who is on the naughty side) is a cameo of Nero.

    Petronius fell out of favour and committed suicide in a rather strange manner.

    Goings on in the Days of Nero – with numerous Norman Lindsay Illustrations.

    $390.00

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  • A Journey to the Interior of the Earth – Jules Verne – c1905

    A Journey to the Interior of the Earth – Jules Verne – c1905

    Jule Verne classic published by Ward Lock, London, early 20th century, likely pre-WWI. Part of the “Lilley series” – with catalogue at rear indication forty volumes available and another ten in preparation which appears circa 1905. Octavo, 256 pages.

    Lovely pictorial image pasted to front board, with “framing” decoration, which is repeated on the spine. The aforesaid image is repeated as a frontispiece. Some foxing to title and page edges. Generally, given the excellent covers, still a good to better copy for its age.

    Often Journey to the “Centre” here the ”Interior” but we still come out in Iceland, where else? Another slightly unusual translation which adds to the fun.

    Century old Jules Verne – off into the Centre (Interior)

    $80.00

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  • Stories of King Arthur & His Knights – U Waldo Cutler (After Malory) – 1911

    Stories of King Arthur & His Knights – U Waldo Cutler (After Malory) – 1911

    Published by George Harrap, London in 1914 a first edition of this type.

    Retold from Malory’s “Morte DArthur” by Uriel Waldo Cutler (1854-1936). Cutler’s efforts well recognised and first in print in 1904

    Octavo, 236 pages with a lovely pictorial cover and spine in pretty good condition. Prize label on front end paper to some bright spark dated 1921.

    Nicely illustrated with a striking colour frontispiece of “Sir Lancelot before the Cross” by Stella Langdale. Fourteen other full page plates from work by Rosseti, Burne-Jones and others.

    The legendary tales were first put down in one place by George of Monmouth in the early thirteen century. In the fifteenth century Sir Thomas Malory produced the definitive work “Le Morte Darthur” completed in 1470, This was at the time Caxton really got going with his printing press so Malory’s work was destined to be promoted and preserved.

    Naturally, the language and expression of Malory’s writing reflects the period and “modern” writers have edited the text to be readable nowadays. Waldo Cutler did a magnificent job and presents Arthur here in 42 progressive tales.

    A scarce nicely presented Arthur

    $90.00

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  • Was Jane Austen Happy in Bath? – Nigel Nicolson

    Was Jane Austen Happy in Bath? – Nigel Nicolson

    Jane Austen lived at No 4 Sydney Place, Bath with her parents between 1801 and 1806. Many authorities suggest Austen was much more at home in the country .. and in fact did not like urban living.

    Nigel Nicolson explores the evidence that suggest the contrary regarding her time at Bath. This work relates to a lecture given by Nicolson at the Holburne Museum of Art on 27th June 2002. And published by the Museum.

    Octavo, card cover with separate wrapping jacket, 23 pages plus (oddly named) a page of “footnotes at the end. A nice little production I fine condition.

    Nigel Nicolson (1917-2004) was the son of Sir Harold Nicolson and Vita Sackville West. He was a prolific writer and publisher … including works on Austen, Virginia Woolf and his mother of whom he wrote openly about her bisexuality which in the day caused a bit of a surprise.

    A special one for the Jane Austen fans by a distinguished authority.

    $40.00

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