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English History

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  • Antique Maps – Moreland and Bannister

    Antique Maps – Moreland and Bannister

    Third edition enhanced softcover edition published in 1993. Very good condition. Published by Phaidon.

    Small quarto, 326 pages, numerous relevant illustrations, some in colour. A special production as would be expected from specialist publisher Phaidon.

    The book starts with an image of Novae Guinea by Cornelis e Jode, Antwerp 1593 … the first map to show what is a fantasy of Australia with Lions an Dragons!

    One of the better book on antique maps and map collecting. Three principal sections … Map Making; Map Makers and Map Collecting followed by a Biographical Supplement … three Appendices regarding … Editions of Ptolemy’s Geographia; Blaeu/ Jansson Maps of the English and Welsh Counties and a Historical Charts – Map Making 600BC-AD1800. Finished with a good Bibliography and Index.

    A serious book on antique maps for those who want a deeper understanding

    $30.00

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  • Honours Conferred by Charles II (A Catalogue of Nobility) – First Edition 1662

    Honours Conferred by Charles II (A Catalogue of Nobility) – First Edition 1662

    Printed by Robert Pawley at the Sign of the Bible in Chancery-Lane near the Temple 1662.

    Full and proper title … Catalogue of Nobility – The Names and Titles of all such Dukes, Earls, Viscounts and Barons, Knights of the Garter, Knights of the Bath, and Knights Baronets, made by His Majesty K. Charles II. With the times of their Creations. Also, The Names of His Majesties Privy Council, the Bishops and Piers of the Realm as they are placed in this present Parliament. With the addition of above 40 new Honours.

    Small octavo, 68 pages after title and one-page Publishers Catalogue … which include the then useful “A Collection of What is Treason by the Laws of England”.

    Rebound at some date in full vellum with gilt titles to front in decorative gilt broader, nice gilt devices and lines to spine, silk ribbon added. A very nice presentation.

    After the restoration of the Monarchy in 1660, King Charles II quickly enhanced the “system” of privilege … the old names were there … Percy of Northumberland but many new ones were added … with all that in place his back was covered? And more time could be afforded to his greatest joy … to party.

    Period record of the Honours of Charles II – 1662

    $290.00

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  • Early 19th Century Pope Joan Card Game Staking Board

    Early 19th Century Pope Joan Card Game Staking Board

    A striking example of a Pope Joan Staking Board, likely Georgian.

    A red lacquered board probably made in China for the English market. The circular pot to hold counters is surrounded by eight divisions. The borders embellished to describe each of the compartments … the Nine of Diamonds (Which represents “Pope Joan”; The Ace, King, Queen and Jack of Diamonds, and the words Matrimony, Intrigue and Game with floral devices in gilt in-between. Still has the top to the pot (often missing) with more card decorations. Does not have a wooden pedestal foot which would have screwed on below. 24cm in diameter. Likely made from Birch or some other decorative light wood. A really super example.

    An 18th Century round game of cards for three to eight players derived French games and related to but less elaborate than Newmarket. It did not appear in Hoyle until 1814 but had been mentioned in early dictionaries. Pope Joan refers to the suspicion that Pope John VIII was actually a woman.

    Two Hundred Year Old Staking Board for Pope Joan – a lovely decorative piece

    $480.00

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  • Proceedings and Debates of the House of Commons in 1620 and 1621 – Sir Thomas Tyrwhitt from a Period Manuscript by Sir Edward Nicholas – Two Volumes First Edition 1766

    Proceedings and Debates of the House of Commons in 1620 and 1621 – Sir Thomas Tyrwhitt from a Period Manuscript by Sir Edward Nicholas – Two Volumes First Edition 1766

    Title continues…. Collected by a Member of that House. And now Published from his Original Manuscript, in the Library of Queen’s College, Oxford.

    Published by the Clarendon Press, 1766. Two volumes, octavo, 375 pages and 264 pages after preliminaries and with addendum. Complete, and bound in original mottled calf, spine gilt with raised bands and original red leather title labels. A little age, hinges tender but holding will. A genuine antiquarian look.

    Edited by Sir Thomas Tyrwhitt a classical scholar who had been educated at Eton and Queen’s College, Oxford. In 1756 he was under-secretary of war, and then in 1762 clerk of the House of Commons. The original manuscript is attributed to Sir Edward Nicholas, Member for Winchelsea in 1620/21.

    A scarce and valuable source on the political history of James I. Parliament of the day was a source of funds for James and it did not sit for periods if it incurred his displeasure. The country was in a poor economic state. The period was one when patents were used to create monopolies and hence wealth. Conflict arose were the King who felt that allowing patents was a Royal prerogative and Members sought Parliament to control them for personal gain. There was even an attempt to patent Beggars meaning they would be licenced and have to pay an annual fee to the patent holder!

    Serious history plays out … Edward Coke a favourite of Queen Elizabeth I speaks regularly. He had been England’s leading law maker … tried Raleigh and the Gunpowder Plot Accused. Here later in life he continues his hatred of Sir Francis Bacon (now Viscount St Alban). His investigations discover that Bacon had taken bribes and he was soon off to the Tower.

    James in order to raise money through dowry was planning to marry Prince Charles off to a Spanish Princess. Coke campaigned against this preferring war with Spain. James had had enough and told Parliament that it was to wrap up before its term was due. Coke continued to argue and shortly after these journals he too finds himself in the Tower.

    Floyd made rude remarks about the young Royals and found himself riding backward on a horse holding its tail to three different pillory sites … with a paper in his head defining his crime and then off to a place much worse than the Tower … the Fleet Prison.

    Rare details of Parliamentary goings on when it was more interesting than today.

    $390.00

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  • King Arthur – The Cycle of the Round Table – Trade Cards 100 Years Old

    King Arthur – The Cycle of the Round Table – Trade Cards 100 Years Old

    A group of six decorative trade cards by Liebig advertising their tasty Bouillon Oxo. Printed and issued around 1910. In the French with a good description the rear of the card … a good language lesson.

    Delightful chromolithographs depicting (1) Arthur defending Wales; (2) His wedding procession with his bride Guinevere; (3) A Feast at The Round Table; (4) Arthur in Ireland receiving tributes; (5) Perceval sets off on his Adventures (6) The Death of Arthur. Each 10cms x 7.3cms.

    King Arthur done proud by Liebig

    $80.00

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  • Stories of King Arthur & His Knights – U Waldo Cutler (After Malory) – 1911

    Stories of King Arthur & His Knights – U Waldo Cutler (After Malory) – 1911

    Published by George Harrap, London in 1914 a first edition of this type.

    Retold from Malory’s “Morte DArthur” by Uriel Waldo Cutler (1854-1936). Cutler’s efforts well recognised and first in print in 1904

    Octavo, 236 pages with a lovely pictorial cover and spine in pretty good condition. Prize label on front end paper to some bright spark dated 1921.

    Nicely illustrated with a striking colour frontispiece of “Sir Lancelot before the Cross” by Stella Langdale. Fourteen other full page plates from work by Rosseti, Burne-Jones and others.

    The legendary tales were first put down in one place by George of Monmouth in the early thirteen century. In the fifteenth century Sir Thomas Malory produced the definitive work “Le Morte Darthur” completed in 1470, This was at the time Caxton really got going with his printing press so Malory’s work was destined to be promoted and preserved.

    Naturally, the language and expression of Malory’s writing reflects the period and “modern” writers have edited the text to be readable nowadays. Waldo Cutler did a magnificent job and presents Arthur here in 42 progressive tales.

    A scarce nicely presented Arthur

    $90.00

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