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  • The Story of the Rear Column of the Emin Pasha Relief Expedition (Jameson’s Story of the Rear Column) – First UK Edition 1890.

    The Story of the Rear Column of the Emin Pasha Relief Expedition (Jameson’s Story of the Rear Column) – First UK Edition 1890.

    First UK edition 1890 published by R.H. Porter, London. A book edited by Mrs James Jameson … as the author of the diaries, letters etc upon which this is based died during the expedition. Published partly to exonerate her husband from rather difficult accusations

    Royal octavo, 455 pages with 100 plus illustrations. Two pages of folding maps at the rear that if which joined must be close to two metres long [We have only shown a scan on one map in two scans, in the images provied]. Really nice “Woodburytype” of Jameson as frontispiece. Original green cloth covered boards, gilt title to spine, gilt device to front with some loss of gilt. Some age, generally in a good to better condition. Illustrations by Charles Whymper from sketches by Jameson

    This is one of the four important accounts concerning the Henry Morton Stanley lead mega-expedition of 1886 to 1889 to save Emin Pasha who was under siege as the Governor of Equatoria. Stanley had put together an impressive yet unusual array of officers and gentlemen to assist in the expedition. Stanley’s account is written up in his best seller “In Darkest Africa” … volumes written within a few weeks of the expedition being over whilst resting in Cairo.

    It is a long story … Stanley heavily connected to Prince Leopold of Belgium decided to approach Equatoria, in the east from the west coast, up the Congo and through some very difficult previously unexplored territory “Darkest Africa”. There were many difficulties and mainly due to the immense number of personal and feeding them etc he decided to split the venture and produce and Advance and Rear Column

    James s Jameson was of the Irish whiskey family and a man of money. He was assigned to the Rear Column under the command of Barttlot. He acted as Naturalist and Artist. The organisation within the rear column quickly was in disarray many because they were left with insufficient currency to procure men, food etc (which was ammunition). Barttlet was shot attempting to strike a woman. Jameson got involved in one of the greatest scandals of the 19thC. He was said to be obsessively intertest in cannibalism and procured a young woman paying ten silk handkerchiefs … and the purpose was for him to witness her being offered in a ritual act of cannibalism. It is suggested he made sketches of various parts of the process. A Syrian translator with the Rear Column, Assad Farran, exposed these goings on which naturally Jameson vehemently denied … the book containing letters back to his wife etc on the affair … news of which had reached London. Perhaps fortuitously, Jameson contracted a fever and died.

    Jameson – in Stanley’s Darkest Africa with the Rear Column

    $290.00

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  • Heroes of the Polar Seas – J. Kennedy Maclean – 1910

    Heroes of the Polar Seas – J. Kennedy Maclean – 1910

    Title continues … A Record of Exploration in the Arctic and Antarctic Seas by J Kennedy Maclean. Published by Chambers Edinburgh, thick octavo, 404 pages. Magnificent pictorial boards, well illustrated with two maps of the top and the bottom. Some spotting and spine ends a bit pulled, otherwise a pretty good copy.

    The pictorial boards may give the impression this was for a younger audience. The quality of the content and writing suggest the market was father and son.

    Written chronologically with an introduction of “Gains and losses of Polar Enterprise” before the “Pioneers”. The search for the North-west passage and Franklin and much about his horrors. Nares and then the fatal “Jannette” an incredible story often lost in these accounts. The discovery of Franz Josef Land and the North-east Passage by Nordenskiold. Peary and the success of the North Pole after twenty years … and Cook.

    In the South, Scotland’s share of the then exploration and Scott’s Discovery Expedition. Shackleton’s Farthest South (so close) and the great race for the Pole.

    At the time of publication the race to the pole had just been won and the tragedy of Scott’s expedition known but not fully understood. Tributes had begun to flow.

    A Voyager favourite … an obscure but relevant Polar item.

    $140.00

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  • Log of the Centurion – The Anson Voyage – The Log of Saumarez – Leo Heaps

    Log of the Centurion – The Anson Voyage – The Log of Saumarez – Leo Heaps

    The great Anson circumnavigation of the mid-18th century to basically steal as much Spanish gold – as possible (successful in that regard). This book based on the papers of Captain Saumarez and an essential part of the incredible story that makes up this historic adventure.

    Based on the original papers of Captain Philip Saumarez on Board HMS Centurion, Lord Anson’s flagship during his circumnavigation 1740-44.

    The four Saumarez logs have not been previously published or referenced. They had been lost for year until found in the 1960’s in a cardboard box along with letter and other documents at the Saumerez manor in the Channel Islands.

    Published by Macmillan, New York a first edition 1974.Large octavo, 264 pages, world map end papers showing the track of the fleet, numerous illustrations from original works, some in colour. A very good copy.

    While Great Britain was at war with Spain in 1740, Commodore George Anson led a Squadron of eight ships on a mission to harass the Spaniards on the west coast of South America and cut off their supplies of wealth from the Pacific.

    “Returning to England in 1744 by way of China and thus completing a circumnavigation, the voyage was notable for the capture of the gold laden Acapulco Galleon but also for the loss of all ships except Anson’s Centurion and horrific losses to disease with only 300 of the original 900 surviving.

    Anson’s voyage is remembered as a classic tale of endurance and leadership in the face of fearful disasters, but to Englishmen of 1744 it was the treasure of the galleon, triumphantly paraded through the streets of London, which restored national pride after an unsuccessful war against the Spaniards.”

    Saumerez another perspective on Anson

    $40.00

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  • Antique Maps – Moreland and Bannister

    Antique Maps – Moreland and Bannister

    Third edition enhanced softcover edition published in 1993. Very good condition. Published by Phaidon.

    Small quarto, 326 pages, numerous relevant illustrations, some in colour. A special production as would be expected from specialist publisher Phaidon.

    The book starts with an image of Novae Guinea by Cornelis e Jode, Antwerp 1593 … the first map to show what is a fantasy of Australia with Lions an Dragons!

    One of the better book on antique maps and map collecting. Three principal sections … Map Making; Map Makers and Map Collecting followed by a Biographical Supplement … three Appendices regarding … Editions of Ptolemy’s Geographia; Blaeu/ Jansson Maps of the English and Welsh Counties and a Historical Charts – Map Making 600BC-AD1800. Finished with a good Bibliography and Index.

    A serious book on antique maps for those who want a deeper understanding

    $30.00

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  • Australian Frogmouths  – Broinowski – 1890

    Australian Frogmouths – Broinowski – 1890

    An original hand finished chromolithograph from Broinowksi’s magnificent wok on Australian birds published late in the Victorian era.

    Two frogmouths … Podargus Strigoides (Tawny Frogmouth) an Podargus Plumiferus (Marbled Frogmouth). With moderate gum arabic highlights on the eyes, beaks and wing tips.

    Matted nicely ready to frame. Printed area 31cm by 24cm. external mat dimensions 43cm by 34cm. A nice example of the desirable frogmouth image … easier to see here than out in the bush.

    Price $140.00 unframed but nicely matted as described. Sorry our scanner is too small to show the full effect of the matting … its nice … double matted with French lines coloured and gilt.

    Australian Frogmouths … very Australian

    $140.00

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  • The Collected Poems of Sidney Keyes – With Unpublished typescript Poem “Ode to Hitler”

    The Collected Poems of Sidney Keyes – With Unpublished typescript Poem “Ode to Hitler”

    Published posthumously by Routledge, London a fourth impression, 1951. Small octavo, xxiv, 123 pages, original binding, very good condition. The typescript poem “Ode to Hitler’ is dated June 1941 (whilst he was till at Oxford – see below). There is a manuscript note on the endpapers “including unpublished poem”; also a note from Anthony Smith, Headmaster of Dartford Grammar School, which Keyes attended “Dear Professor Porter, I am returning three items we borrowed from you …”. This is October, 1987 and there had been a special Keyes Conference held at the school that year … it is possible that the unique poem was one of the borrowed items, and that this book was Porter’s Professor Porter is likely the Theologian who was at Oriel college, Oxford for 13 years from 1949.

    The typescript poem contains an overtyped correction “Lonely” in the third last line – shown in the image. The manuscript date “June 1941” is surely in Sidney Keyes’ hand, by comparison with the facsimile of a hand written poem included in “Collected Poems”

    This is a special story. Sidney Keyes (1922-1943) was raised by his maternal grandparent, his mother died shortly after his birth. He began writing poetry at a very young age, influenced by Wordsworth, Rilke and Jung. He won a scholarship to Queen’s College, Oxford. At University he wrote two books “The Cruel Solstice” and “The Iron Laurel” for which he was later awarded the Hawthornden Prize. He was very active at Oxford editing the Cherwell Magazine and forming a dramatic society. Leaving Oxford in 1942 he joined the army and sadly died in active service in Tunisia in April 1943.

    All up there are 110 poems of which half relate to the War. All of his poems written during active service were lost.

    “Ode to Hitler” is a seven verse poem the first six comprising seven lines, the last six. It is a serious matter, whilst being clear in meaning. We do not want to publish all here … but here are the final lines.

    “You tapeworm of the mind, you will forgive
    My wanderings, stung by a sudden fury;
    Not even speaking for my country, only
    A mouthing sharp-tongued poet for the lonely
    And awkward speaking. But you will never thrive
    While we, the sour and cunning, stay alive.”

    A special writer and poet who gave his life too young and, a potentially important unpublished work.

    ENQUIRIES WELCOME

    $0.00

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