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  • Tek Sing Shipwreck Treasure [Reeds, Peony and Bamboo] – Wrecked in 1822 Gaspar Straits

    Tek Sing Shipwreck Treasure [Reeds, Peony and Bamboo] – Wrecked in 1822 Gaspar Straits

    Qing Dynasty decorated bowl recovered by Mike Hatcher from the Tek Sing shipwreck. A special example.

    Unusual more extensive decoration with a central spray of reeds emanating from rockwork, peony flowers to the left and a very nice bamboo image to the right. Three small floral designs under rim and two character marks to centre. Blue circle around foot and likely under rim. Larger example bowl for Tek Sing, 15 cm in diameter 3.0 cm high, with a good foot. Retains the Nagel auction and catalogue stickers underneath for provenance.

    A Tek Sing special – Nice strong and uncommon decoration.
    ________________________

    The Tek Sing Shipwreck – Background

    The Tek Sing (Chinese for “Bright Star”’) was a large Chinese Junk which sank in 1822 in the South China Sea at the Belvidere Shoals. She was 50 meters long, 10 metres wide and weighed a thousand tons. Manned by a crew of 200. The great loss of life has led to the Tek Sing being referred to as the “Titanic of the East”.

    Sailing from the port of Amoy (now Xiamen), the Tek Sing was bound for Jakarta, with a cargo of porcelain goods and 1,600 Chinese immigrants. After a month of sailing, Captain Lo Tauko took a shortcut through the Gaspar Straits and ran aground on a reef and sank in 100 feet of water.

    The next morning and English East Indiaman captained by James Pearl sailing from Indonesia to Borneo passed through the Gaspar Straits. He found debris from the sunken Chinese vessel and survivors. They managed to rescue 190 people

    In 1999, marine salvor Mike Hatcher discovered the wreck. His crew raised what has been described as the largest cache of Chinese porcelain ever recovered. It was auctioned by Nagle in Stuttgart, Germany the following year

    $220.00

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  • Tek Sing Shipwreck Treasure [Peony and Magnolia] – 1822

    Tek Sing Shipwreck Treasure [Peony and Magnolia] – 1822

    Qing Dynasty decorated bowl recovered by Mike Hatcher from the Tek Sing shipwreck. A lovely example.

    Beautifully and quite fully decorated with peony flowers and magnolias and, maybe what is a rock-wall at centre. Three Lingzhi fungus sprays under rim, blue glaze circles under rim and around foot. Strong colouring. A small nicely curved bowl 10.5 cm in diameter 2.5 cm high. Retains the Nagel auction and catalogue stickers underneath for provenance.

    Super example of a Tek Sing shipwreck bowl
    ________________________

    The Tek Sing Shipwreck – Background

    The Tek Sing (Chinese for “Bright Star”’) was a large Chinese Junk which sank in 1822 in the South China Sea at the Belvidere Shoals. She was 50 meters long, 10 metres wide and weighed a thousand tons. Manned by a crew of 200. The great loss of life has led to the Tek Sing being referred to as the “Titanic of the East”.

    Sailing from the port of Amoy (now Xiamen), the Tek Sing was bound for Jakarta, with a cargo of porcelain goods and 1,600 Chinese immigrants. After a month of sailing, Captain Lo Tauko took a shortcut through the Gaspar Straits and ran aground on a reef and sank in 100 feet of water.

    The next morning and English East Indiaman captained by James Pearl sailing from Indonesia to Borneo passed through the Gaspar Straits. He found debris from the sunken Chinese vessel and survivors. They managed to rescue 190 people.

    In 1999, marine salvor Mike Hatcher discovered the wreck. His crew raised what has been described as the largest cache of Chinese porcelain ever recovered. It was auctioned by Nagle in Stuttgart, Germany the following year

    $150.00

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  • Tek Sing Shipwreck Treasure – 1822

    Tek Sing Shipwreck Treasure – 1822

    Qing Dynasty decorated bowl recovered by Mike Hatcher from the Tek Sing shipwreck. A very good completely undamaged example.

    Beautifully and quite intensely decorated with peony flowers to the centre and rim, the latter in decorative band. Stylised flowers under rim and a blue line circling the foot. Strong colouring.

    One of the larger bowls 15.5 cm in diameter 3.5 cm high. Retains the original Nagel auction sticker and catalogue reference underneath, which provides clear provenance.

    Price $240.00
    Bright well decorated shipwreck bowl
    ________________________

    The Tek Sing Shipwreck – Background

    The Tek Sing (Chinese for “Bright Star”’) was a large Chinese Junk which sank in 1822 in the South China Sea at the Belvidere Shoals. She was 50 meters long, 10 metres wide and weighed a thousand tons. Manned by a crew of 200. The great loss of life has led to the Tek Sing being referred to as the “Titanic of the East”.

    Sailing from the port of Amoy (now Xiamen), the Tek Sing was bound for Jakarta, with a cargo of porcelain goods and 1,600 Chinese immigrants. After a month of sailing, Captain Lo Tauko took a shortcut through the Gaspar Straits and ran aground on a reef and sank in 100 feet of water.

    The next morning and English East Indiaman captained by James Pearl sailing from Indonesia to Borneo passed through the Gaspar Straits. He found debris from the sunken Chinese vessel and survivors. They managed to rescue 190 people.

    In 1999, marine salvor Mike Hatcher discovered the wreck. His crew raised what has been described as the largest cache of Chinese porcelain ever recovered. It was auctioned by Nagle in Stuttgart, Germany the following year

    $240.00

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  • Explorations in Garhwal around Karmet [Important Mountaineering Report] – Journal of the Royal Geographical Society – January 1932.

    Explorations in Garhwal around Karmet [Important Mountaineering Report] – Journal of the Royal Geographical Society – January 1932.

    The Journal of the Royal Geographical Society, January 1932, containing a report by legendary mountaineer Frank Smythe relating to the climbing of Kamet, then the highest peak climbed in the World. During the expedition they discovered and named the “Valley of Flowers” now a National Park in Sikkim. Smythe wrote well and his report is a good example of “in the moment narrative” .. you can almost feel the chills. Super images from original photographs accompany this article.

    Other articles of substance include, in the Rockies, the confirmation of the Purcell as the source of the Kootenay River and, a traverse through Norwegian Lapland by Charles Elton.

    Usual original blue wrappers, good photographs as mentioned and maps for reference. A crease across early pages from storage [priced accordingly], else clean and bright, a worthy copy of a scarce mountaineering report.

    Frank Smythe later overshadowed by Everest but up there with the best Mountaineer explorers.

    $70.00

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  • Tibetan Marches – Andre Migot

    Tibetan Marches – Andre Migot

    Translated from the French by Peter Fleming.

    Published by the Readers Union in conjunction with Rupert Hart-Davis , London in 1956. Published first by RHD the year before.

    Octavo, 302 pages, with illustration from original photographs and end paper maps of the route of Andre Migot in his travels between Kunming to Tangar between December 1946 to September 1947.

    A super travel account soon after the end of WWII and just before the Chinese influence altered traditional Buddhist Tibet. Migot loved the Tibetans with a passion despite being robbed during his journey by bandits.

    Frenchman Migot a super travel writer in Tibet and all through it at an important time.

    $30.00

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  • Everest is Climbed [Special Illustrated Work 1954] – Wilfred Noyce and Richard Taylor

    Everest is Climbed [Special Illustrated Work 1954] – Wilfred Noyce and Richard Taylor

    A very good copy of a very usual period “Puffin Picture Book” describing and celebrating the fits ascent of Everest. Noyce (teacher) was part of the expedition team lead by Hunt (soldier) and remembered for Hillary (beekeeper) and Tenzing (sirdar).

    Landscape staple bound soft cover 31 pages, profusely illustrated a really super piece of work not like anything else on the subject. Published by Penguin with permission from Hodder in 1954.

    Starts with the history of the “objective” after the team backgrounds … with Mallory and the 1922 expedition. The finding of Mallory’s ice axe 1933 and a table on notable achievements up to the final success. The Southern Route and the Great Crevasse. Oxygen systems and how they work. Base camp and the choices of tents as they advance. Climbing equipment and the nine camps to the top. The Western Cwm and the author Noyce at the Geneva Spur overlooking the South Col. The final trek to the top along the South east Ridge.

    Postage will likely be reduced on final billing.

    Rather unique Everest ephemera with genuine content and special illustrations of the period.

    $40.00

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