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Law

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  • Royal Society of Tasmania – Papers & Proceedings – 1926 [the Dutch in Tasmania and Crowther]

    Royal Society of Tasmania – Papers & Proceedings – 1926 [the Dutch in Tasmania and Crowther]

    Contains an important historical paper by Clive Lord on the planting of the Dutch Flag in Tasmania.

    Geoffrey Ingleton’s copy … Ingleton Catalogue stamp no 14258 on rear cover.

    Perfect bound in original paper covers, 196 pages with 11 plates and 22 figures within the text.

    Contents further include inter alia … Isostatic Background of Tasmanian Physiography; the Constitutional Separation of Tasmania from New South Wales 1825; Oil Shales of Tasmania; Tasmanian Spiders; Tasmanian Cetacea; New and Little Known Tasmanian Lepidoptera; Notes on the Tasmanian Race (Crowther) etc etc. As well as the formalities … Annual Report etc.

    The Dutch plant their flag and Crowther on the Tasmanian Aborigines

    $60.00

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  • Sir Samuel Walker Griffith’s – Literal translation of The Inferno of Dante Alighieri. [Printed Draft Signed and Gifted to Governor of Queensland] 1903

    Sir Samuel Walker Griffith’s – Literal translation of The Inferno of Dante Alighieri. [Printed Draft Signed and Gifted to Governor of Queensland] 1903

    A unique item, a printed DRAFT of S.W.G’s mammoth translation of Dante’s Inferno. More so as it is signed by S.W.G. as a gift to the then Queensland Governor Sir Herbert Chermside.

    Printed by Powell & Company, Adelaide Street Brisbane … legal and Government Printers, in 1903. Octavo softcover, probably later basic re-enforcement to spine. 136 pages comprising in its entirety of The Inferno and a Title which is a repeat of the cover. Aged somewhat externally with darkening to the card boards. Internally bright and clean with a few tears to the inner crease of one gathering, nothing troublesome. S.W.G’s minor correction by hand in three spots. The final work, itself very scarce was published in Sydney in 1908.

    Sir Samuel Walker Griffith GCMG QC (1845-1920) politician, Premier of Queensland, Chief Justice of the High Court of Australia, and a principal author of the Constitution of Australia. In 1865 he gained the T.S. Mort Travelling Fellowship and spent most of his time in Italy becoming very much attached to the Italian people and their literature. This the first translation of Dante by an Australian is a remarkable body, scarce, indeed unique in this form.

    The Draft of a little known and important work by a leading light in the history of Australia

    $370.00

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  • [Property Law] – The Complete Court-Keeper: or Land-Steward’s Assistant – Giles Jacob – 1741

    [Property Law] – The Complete Court-Keeper: or Land-Steward’s Assistant – Giles Jacob – 1741

    A fourth edition; with large Additions and Amendments, and the Precedents in English. In the Savoy: Printed by Henry Lintot for Woodward, Browne et al. Thick octavo, 522 pages after preliminaries bound in polished calf, red leather label worn. The odd manuscript note including some land prices for 1749. Good antiquarian patina.

    Giles Jacob (1686-1744) was an early legal writer of note. This was his first work the first edition published in 1713. He wrote numerous legal works all of which were quite popular. He also wrote poetry and plays lampooning Alexander Pope’s “The Rape of the Lock” with his “the Rape of the Smock” rather low and bawdy. For this and similar reasons he raised the ire of Pope who included him in his ‘the Dunciad” of 1728 … quote “Jacob, the scourge of grammar, mark with awe … Nor less revere him, blunderbuss of law”

    Otherwise the book was held in high regard for its ease of understanding … not common in the period. Set out in five broad sections.

    First, The Nature of Courts Leet and Courts Baron; with a general Introduction to every thing incident to them, according to Law and Custom.

    Secondly, The manners of holding Courts Leet, Courts Barron and Courts of Survey, with the Charge to the Juries; and the Form of Entring those Courts in the Minute-Books and in the Court-Rolls; with Precedents of great Variety of Presentments, Amerciaments, Estreats, Copies of Court-Roll for Life, and in Fee; Grants, Surrenders, Admittances, Licences, Forfeitures, and all other Proceedings of that Nature.

    Thirdly, The Manner of Keeping the Court Barron for trying of Actions; the Nature and Kinds of Actions, and of the Pleadings; and Precedents of Declarations and Pleadings, and of Process from the Precept or Original to the Distress or Execution; with Pleas and Recoveries concerning Copyhold Lands.

    Fourthly, Precedents of Contracts, Conditions, Covenants, Leases for Life, Leases for Years, Assignments, Mortgages, Surrenders of such Leases etc etc

    For those curious, an Amerciament is a punishment at the discretion of the Court and an Estreat is the copy of a Court Record enforcing a fine of forfeiture. Entring is not a misspelling … Entring-Clerks had a role in the legal fraternity of the period.

    Property Law Giles Jacob – 1741

    $290.00

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  • Arbitration Act , 1892 – Forms and Notes of Cases – James Moriarty – First 1893

    Arbitration Act , 1892 – Forms and Notes of Cases – James Moriarty – First 1893

    James Moriarty, Barrister of Middle Temple had Chambers at 12 Wentworth Court, Sydney.

    This is a first printing 1893 of his work on the position of arbitration law in New South Wales. It follows the relevant Act of 1892. Over 150 cases are cited.

    Octavo, xi, 76 pages, Australian Law Book catalogue as end paper, original deep olive green cloth covered binding, blind embossed to boards, gilt title to spine, pages very bright except the title which has the ghost of a piece of paper once left in there, otherwise a very good copy.

    Historical Law – the Rules on Solving Arguments 1892

    $60.00

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  • Narrative of Some Passages in the History of Van Diemen’s Land, during the Last Three Years of Sir John Franklin’s Administration of its Government

    Narrative of Some Passages in the History of Van Diemen’s Land, during the Last Three Years of Sir John Franklin’s Administration of its Government

    A special facsimile of a very unusual book. The original only issued privately “Not Published” and each of those few issued were annotated by Franklin himself giving some further control we expect over their authenticity.

    A work essentially about the long and vigorous dispute Franklin had towards the end of his time in Tasmania with his Colonial Secretary, John Montagu.

    A young doctor named Coverdale had been dismissed for negligence (a man had died) … Montagu supported this action. Franklin found out further information that suggested Coverdale had been hard done by and re-instated him. Monatagu was not happy, and the way he expressed his feelings verbally and in writing and his later in-actions made his relationship with Franklin unworkable. Lady Jane Franklin was dragged into it … not something that happened lightly in those days.

    Montagu was dismissed back to England. However, in England Montagu pleaded his case very well and gained the support of Lord Stanley, Secretary of State for the Colonies, who essentially reprimanded Franklin who was soon to see his tenure in Tasmania over.

    This personal compilation of evidence by Franklin was completed just as he was off on his Arctic expedition from which he never returned.

    There is a movie in this episode alone.

    This facsimile produced from the copy given by Sir John Franklin to R.I. Murchison. Presumably Roderick Impey Murchison author of Siluria and then President of the Royal Geographical Society. Franklin would have been very close to Murchison at the time due to the Arctic plans.

    Published by Platypus Publications, Hobart in 1967. Octavo, 157 pages, original cloth covered boards (there was no dust jacket). Limited to 750 copies this one numbered 489. A very good copy.

    Sir John Franklin puts his case re Montagu.

    $30.00

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  • Proceedings and Debates of the House of Commons in 1620 and 1621 – Sir Thomas Tyrwhitt from a Period Manuscript by Sir Edward Nicholas – Two Volumes First Edition 1766

    Proceedings and Debates of the House of Commons in 1620 and 1621 – Sir Thomas Tyrwhitt from a Period Manuscript by Sir Edward Nicholas – Two Volumes First Edition 1766

    Title continues…. Collected by a Member of that House. And now Published from his Original Manuscript, in the Library of Queen’s College, Oxford.

    Published by the Clarendon Press, 1766. Two volumes, octavo, 375 pages and 264 pages after preliminaries and with addendum. Complete, and bound in original mottled calf, spine gilt with raised bands and original red leather title labels. A little age, hinges tender but holding will. A genuine antiquarian look.

    Edited by Sir Thomas Tyrwhitt a classical scholar who had been educated at Eton and Queen’s College, Oxford. In 1756 he was under-secretary of war, and then in 1762 clerk of the House of Commons. The original manuscript is attributed to Sir Edward Nicholas, Member for Winchelsea in 1620/21.

    A scarce and valuable source on the political history of James I. Parliament of the day was a source of funds for James and it did not sit for periods if it incurred his displeasure. The country was in a poor economic state. The period was one when patents were used to create monopolies and hence wealth. Conflict arose were the King who felt that allowing patents was a Royal prerogative and Members sought Parliament to control them for personal gain. There was even an attempt to patent Beggars meaning they would be licenced and have to pay an annual fee to the patent holder!

    Serious history plays out … Edward Coke a favourite of Queen Elizabeth I speaks regularly. He had been England’s leading law maker … tried Raleigh and the Gunpowder Plot Accused. Here later in life he continues his hatred of Sir Francis Bacon (now Viscount St Alban). His investigations discover that Bacon had taken bribes and he was soon off to the Tower.

    James in order to raise money through dowry was planning to marry Prince Charles off to a Spanish Princess. Coke campaigned against this preferring war with Spain. James had had enough and told Parliament that it was to wrap up before its term was due. Coke continued to argue and shortly after these journals he too finds himself in the Tower.

    Floyd made rude remarks about the young Royals and found himself riding backward on a horse holding its tail to three different pillory sites … with a paper in his head defining his crime and then off to a place much worse than the Tower … the Fleet Prison.

    Rare details of Parliamentary goings on when it was more interesting than today.

    $340.00

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