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  • The Story of the Rear Column of the Emin Pasha Relief Expedition (Jameson’s Story of the Rear Column) – First UK Edition 1890.

    The Story of the Rear Column of the Emin Pasha Relief Expedition (Jameson’s Story of the Rear Column) – First UK Edition 1890.

    First UK edition 1890 published by R.H. Porter, London. A book edited by Mrs James Jameson … as the author of the diaries, letters etc upon which this is based died during the expedition. Published partly to exonerate her husband from rather difficult accusations

    Royal octavo, 455 pages with 100 plus illustrations. Two pages of folding maps at the rear that if which joined must be close to two metres long [We have only shown a scan on one map in two scans, in the images provied]. Really nice “Woodburytype” of Jameson as frontispiece. Original green cloth covered boards, gilt title to spine, gilt device to front with some loss of gilt. Some age, generally in a good to better condition. Illustrations by Charles Whymper from sketches by Jameson

    This is one of the four important accounts concerning the Henry Morton Stanley lead mega-expedition of 1886 to 1889 to save Emin Pasha who was under siege as the Governor of Equatoria. Stanley had put together an impressive yet unusual array of officers and gentlemen to assist in the expedition. Stanley’s account is written up in his best seller “In Darkest Africa” … volumes written within a few weeks of the expedition being over whilst resting in Cairo.

    It is a long story … Stanley heavily connected to Prince Leopold of Belgium decided to approach Equatoria, in the east from the west coast, up the Congo and through some very difficult previously unexplored territory “Darkest Africa”. There were many difficulties and mainly due to the immense number of personal and feeding them etc he decided to split the venture and produce and Advance and Rear Column

    James s Jameson was of the Irish whiskey family and a man of money. He was assigned to the Rear Column under the command of Barttlot. He acted as Naturalist and Artist. The organisation within the rear column quickly was in disarray many because they were left with insufficient currency to procure men, food etc (which was ammunition). Barttlet was shot attempting to strike a woman. Jameson got involved in one of the greatest scandals of the 19thC. He was said to be obsessively intertest in cannibalism and procured a young woman paying ten silk handkerchiefs … and the purpose was for him to witness her being offered in a ritual act of cannibalism. It is suggested he made sketches of various parts of the process. A Syrian translator with the Rear Column, Assad Farran, exposed these goings on which naturally Jameson vehemently denied … the book containing letters back to his wife etc on the affair … news of which had reached London. Perhaps fortuitously, Jameson contracted a fever and died.

    Jameson – in Stanley’s Darkest Africa with the Rear Column

    $290.00

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  • Heroes of the Polar Seas – J. Kennedy Maclean – 1910

    Heroes of the Polar Seas – J. Kennedy Maclean – 1910

    Title continues … A Record of Exploration in the Arctic and Antarctic Seas by J Kennedy Maclean. Published by Chambers Edinburgh, thick octavo, 404 pages. Magnificent pictorial boards, well illustrated with two maps of the top and the bottom. Some spotting and spine ends a bit pulled, otherwise a pretty good copy.

    The pictorial boards may give the impression this was for a younger audience. The quality of the content and writing suggest the market was father and son.

    Written chronologically with an introduction of “Gains and losses of Polar Enterprise” before the “Pioneers”. The search for the North-west passage and Franklin and much about his horrors. Nares and then the fatal “Jannette” an incredible story often lost in these accounts. The discovery of Franz Josef Land and the North-east Passage by Nordenskiold. Peary and the success of the North Pole after twenty years … and Cook.

    In the South, Scotland’s share of the then exploration and Scott’s Discovery Expedition. Shackleton’s Farthest South (so close) and the great race for the Pole.

    At the time of publication the race to the pole had just been won and the tragedy of Scott’s expedition known but not fully understood. Tributes had begun to flow.

    A Voyager favourite … an obscure but relevant Polar item.

    $140.00

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  • Log of the Centurion – The Anson Voyage – The Log of Saumarez – Leo Heaps

    Log of the Centurion – The Anson Voyage – The Log of Saumarez – Leo Heaps

    The great Anson circumnavigation of the mid-18th century to basically steal as much Spanish gold – as possible (successful in that regard). This book based on the papers of Captain Saumarez and an essential part of the incredible story that makes up this historic adventure.

    Based on the original papers of Captain Philip Saumarez on Board HMS Centurion, Lord Anson’s flagship during his circumnavigation 1740-44.

    The four Saumarez logs have not been previously published or referenced. They had been lost for year until found in the 1960’s in a cardboard box along with letter and other documents at the Saumerez manor in the Channel Islands.

    Published by Macmillan, New York a first edition 1974.Large octavo, 264 pages, world map end papers showing the track of the fleet, numerous illustrations from original works, some in colour. A very good copy.

    While Great Britain was at war with Spain in 1740, Commodore George Anson led a Squadron of eight ships on a mission to harass the Spaniards on the west coast of South America and cut off their supplies of wealth from the Pacific.

    “Returning to England in 1744 by way of China and thus completing a circumnavigation, the voyage was notable for the capture of the gold laden Acapulco Galleon but also for the loss of all ships except Anson’s Centurion and horrific losses to disease with only 300 of the original 900 surviving.

    Anson’s voyage is remembered as a classic tale of endurance and leadership in the face of fearful disasters, but to Englishmen of 1744 it was the treasure of the galleon, triumphantly paraded through the streets of London, which restored national pride after an unsuccessful war against the Spaniards.”

    Saumerez another perspective on Anson

    $40.00

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  • A Voyage Round the World in His Majesty’s Frigate Pandora – George Hamilton

    A Voyage Round the World in His Majesty’s Frigate Pandora – George Hamilton

    The Pandora was sent to recover the Bounty and bring back the Mutineers. The voyage is an extraordinary story told with a light and readable touch by George Hamilton, surgeon onboard. After having recovered some Mutineers the Pandora was wrecked on the Barrier Reef approaching the Torres Straits.

    One of a limited edition of 950 copies published by Hordern House in 1998. Octavo, illustrated, bound in quarter cherry Scotish calf with marbled paper covered boards.

    A faithful facsimile of the Voyage of the Pandora a rare 1793 publication connected to Bligh’s Mutiny on the Bounty.

    HMS Pandora was a sixth rate Porcupine class naval vessel. She was commissioned in May 1779, built by Adams & Barnard, Deptford. Pandora saw action in the war against France in that year and in the American War of Independence. She was then mothballed from 1783. In 1790 having heard of the Bounty Mutiny, the First Lord of the Admiralty, Lord Chatham despatched her, under Captain Edward Edwards, to recover the Bounty and capture the Mutineers. When they arrived at Tahiti, they found that a group of fourteen mutineers had broken away from Fletcher Christian and returned there. Some surrendered themselves, including Peter Heywood, others proved more difficult, but eventually all fourteen were captured and locked in a cell on board … known as Pandora’s Box. The Pandora visited numerous islands looking for the others … but only managed to lose some of their own crew to desertion. They headed west for home, but the ship ran aground on 29th August 1791 on the outer Great barrier Reef. She soon sank with 35 men lost including 4 of the Bounty Mutineers. The survivors made for a sand cay and two days later sailed in four open boats for Indonesia.

    The wreck was found in 1977 jointly by John Heyer and Ben Cropp, after much competition to be the first to the spot. The Queensland Museum excavated the wreck under a team led by Peter Gesner who wrote the forward to this book.

    HMS Pandora … the recovery of the Bounty Mutineers and its Shipwreck on the Barrier Reef.

    $190.00

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  • The Emin Pasha Relief Expedition – My Personal Experiences in Equatorial Africa as Medical Officer – Thomas Parke – First Edition 1891

    The Emin Pasha Relief Expedition – My Personal Experiences in Equatorial Africa as Medical Officer – Thomas Parke – First Edition 1891

    Published by Sampson Low etc, London in 1891 a first edition.

    Large thick royal octavo, 526 pages plus publishers advertisements. Original green cloth with gilt titles to spine and gilt illustration to front cover, from a drawing by Dorothy Stanley (Henry Stanley’s Wife). Frontispiece of the author, 17 other plates, large (70cm by 39cm) folding coloured map by Stanfords in end-pocket.

    A bit of light spotting in some early pages and then in a group of three or four half way through, otherwise pretty clean. The map is in super condition, colours bright, track marked out in red etc.

    Thomas Heazle Parke (1857-1893) an Irish born surgeon who had joined the Egyptian Army and served at Tel el-Kebir in 1882. Soon became Director of the Hospital at Helwan. In 1885 he was involved in the relief of Gordan at Khartoum. He was appointed to Stanley’s expedition more or less by accident. Stanley met him at Alexandria on his way through … must have come without proper medical assistance .. Parke was his man. He spent three years as part of the Advance Column. Known as “the man who saved Stanley’s life” he saved many more … famously sucked the poison from arrow wound in the chest of Captain Stairs. He was, as a consequence of the expedition, the first Irishman to cross Africa.

    His account is a lively read, largely by its clear editing of Parke’s meticulous daily journals. He was a supporter of Stanley (there were two camps), who he thought … “carried us through a series of difficulties which, I believe, no other living man would have been able to battle with so successfully”.

    Stanley Expedition – Relief of Emin Pasha – Parke’s account

    SO SORRY SOLD

    $380.00

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  • Douglas Mawson – Report from the British Antarctic Expedition – Transactions and Proceedings of The Royal Society of South Australia

    Douglas Mawson – Report from the British Antarctic Expedition – Transactions and Proceedings of The Royal Society of South Australia

    Published by the Society, Adelaide 1916, Being Volume XL.

    Thick octavo, 631 pages with 54 plates and 21 figures in the text, Mawson map and folding diagram. Fine condition, barely opened, clean as a whistle inside. Unusually still in its original mailing envelope albeit chipped here and there. A super copy.

    Numerous papers, many on entomology, marine species, flora, mineralogy etc.

    Douglas Mawson features twice. First, his report on the Aurora Australis … “Aural Observations at the Cape Royds Station, Antarctica”. Pages 151-213 with plates xxi and xxii. The observations were taken during the British Antarctic Expedition in 1908. Mawson states that they were intended for publication in 1911. The delay was due to Shackleton wishing to publish the Scientific Reports as a series. However, for lack of funds this could not happen, and the series ides was abandoned, allowing this work to be published here. Special thanks are given to Edgeworth David for his contribution to the work.

    Second, “Mineral Notes” is based on Mawson’s analysis of minerals exhibited at the Society in 1910 and 1911. Publication, gain, had been delayed … this time because Mawson mislaid his notes before departing for his own Antarctic Expedition of 1911. Minerals described include … Octahedrite, Twinned Gypsum Crystals, Beryl, Loadstone, Monazite, Cordierite, Sillimanite, Spinel, Sphene, Davidite, named after the great man, and much here about the radioactive properties. An addendum page by W.T. Cooke on the constituency of Davidite with reference to the spectroscopic work of the great Sir William Crookes identifying Scandium as a component.

    Another standout report is by Walter Howchin on “The Geology of Mount Remarkable” pages 545- 584 with large coloured Geological Sketch Map.

    Nicely illustrated journal with interesting reports by Douglas Mawson in very good condition.

    $140.00

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