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Maritime

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  • Byron of the Wager – Peter Shankland

    Byron of the Wager – Peter Shankland

    The detailed story of the loss of the Wager in the Strait of Magellan during Lord Anson’s circumnavigation of the 1740’s with a primary aim of sticking it up the Spanish fleet.

    Published by Coward, New York a first edition 1975. Octavo, 288 pages with illustrated endpapers, maps and illustrations. A little rubbing to jacket (now Brodart protected as all Voyager books), still a very good copy.

    Through the eyes of the Hon John Byron Lieutenant who wrote a primary account of the events, before during and after. Fourth Lord Byron was the famous poets Grandfather and went on to be respective Admiral of the fleet.

    One of the greatest wreck stories, part of a the monumental Anson voyage (despite its losses) and an individual who would go on to be a maritime legend.

    The wager better than any novel … tension, intrigue, excitement

    $35.00

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  • Log of the Centurion – The Anson Voyage – The Log of Saumarez – Edited Leo Heaps

    Log of the Centurion – The Anson Voyage – The Log of Saumarez – Edited Leo Heaps

    The great Anson circumnavigation of the mid-18th century to basically steal as much Spanish gold – as possible (successful in that regard). This book based on the papers of Captain Saumarez and an essential part of the incredible story that makes up this historic adventure.

    Based on the original papers of Captain Philip Saumarez on Board HMS Centurion, Lord Anson’s flagship during his circumnavigation 1740-44.

    The four Saumarez logs have not been previously published or referenced. They had been lost for year until found in the 1960’s in a cardboard box along with letter and other documents at the Saumerez manor in the Channel Islands.

    Published by Macmillan, New York a first edition 1974.Large octavo, 264 pages, world map end papers showing the track of the fleet, numerous illustrations from original works, some in colour. A slight ageing still a very good copy.

    While Great Britain was at war with Spain in 1740, Commodore George Anson led a Squadron of eight ships on a mission to harass the Spaniards on the west coast of South America and cut off their supplies of wealth from the Pacific.

    “Returning to England in 1744 by way of China and thus completing a circumnavigation, the voyage was notable for the capture of the gold laden Acapulco Galleon but also for the loss of all ships except Anson’s Centurion and horrific losses to disease with only 300 of the original 900 surviving.

    Anson’s voyage is remembered as a classic tale of endurance and leadership in the face of fearful disasters, but to Englishmen of 1744 it was the treasure of the galleon, triumphantly paraded through the streets of London, which restored national pride after an unsuccessful war against the Spaniards.”

    Saumerez another perspective on Anson

    $40.00

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  • Bibliography of Antarctic Exploration Expedition Accounts from 1768 to 1960 – Conrad

    Bibliography of Antarctic Exploration Expedition Accounts from 1768 to 1960 – Conrad

    A first edition of Conrad’s superior bibliography. We say superior in that each expedition has its own section which contain a brief expedition account (very good); expedition responsibilities; expedition accomplishments; bibliographic information and reviews the bibliographic entries.

    Makes good use of Spence, Renard, Scott Polar Collection etc. Effectively self-published, Washington, USA 1999.

    Octavo, 424 pages a substantial book in fine condition. One of 975 available copies (set out in WordPerfect for those that remember it!)

    Larry Conrad was in the Antarctic from 1982 to 1985 flying helicopters transporting scientists, explorer and “distinguished visitors” in an area about 150 miles of Ross Island. This would includes Scott’s huts at Hut Point and Cape Evans and Shackleton’s hut on Cape Royds. His interest continued afterwards and this important reference was a result.

    Conrad .. thorough and with expedition accounts.

    SO SORRY SOLD

    $140.00

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  • Important Microscope Slide – HMS Challenger Expedition –  Globigerina Ooze – Station 21 South Atlantic in 1876. Preparer John Browning, the Strand, London.

    Important Microscope Slide – HMS Challenger Expedition – Globigerina Ooze – Station 21 South Atlantic in 1876. Preparer John Browning, the Strand, London.

    Contemporary prepared microscope slides of samples taken on the Challenger Expedition are highly sought after. This one is of particular interest as few can be found prepared by John Browning.

    The Challenger Expedition 1873-1876 was the perhaps the world’s greatest marine focused scientific expedition. Organised by the world’s greatest club. The Royal Society, a total of 126 thousand kms were travelled. She carried 190km of Indian hemp for making soundings and taking samples, had beautiful fitted laboratories and the finest instruments of the day; and no doubt microscopes made by John Browning a leading maker of microscopes and spectroscopes of the highest standard.

    The slide is very clearly labelled with the preparers name and address at 63 The Strand. The date the sample was taken on the Challenger, 21st March 1876. The depth of sample taken, 1,990 fathoms and the location Latitude 21.15 South Longitude 14.2 West.

    On the 21st March 1876 the Challenger had been at sea three years and was on her way home to England. The location is almost the same longitude as Voyager’s favourite island Tristan d’Acunha and a few degrees north.

    Campbell’s “Log Letters from the Challenger” recorded the passage of the vessel. In literally the final paragraph we have our location.

    “On the 6th February 1876 the Challenger left the Falklands for Monte Video; thence she proceeded towards Tristan d’Acunha. [Here they found the water very cold at depth, finding a stratum of water 400 fathoms in thickness below freezing.] From the neighbourhood of Tristan d’Acunha the ship sailed to Ascension, finding shallow soundings, and the bottom temperature 35.9F having left Ascension she touched at Porto Praya, St Vincent, and Vigo, and arrived at Spithead on the 24th May 1878. And so ended the cruise of the Challenger”

    In our images we show a chart showing the track of the vessel (taken from Campbell’s Log-Letters – see our copy) and the nature of various sample taken [Yellow] is Globigerina Ooze. The location of this sample is almost equidistant between Tristan and Ascension [just south west of St Helena}. You will see that it is marked Station 21 and the depth of 1,990 noted.

    Globigerina refers to planktonic foraminifera with calcareous shells.

    See our Research Section for a note on the achievements of John Browning. We have his spectroscopes for sale elsewhere on this site.

    Original Challenger Expedition prepared slide, of good Globigerina sample, from known location and date of sample – rare distinguished preparer.

    $290.00

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  • The Expedition of the St Jean-Baptiste to the Pacific 1769-1770 – John Dunmore

    The Expedition of the St Jean-Baptiste to the Pacific 1769-1770 – John Dunmore

    A most interesting Hakluyt production. This expedition, conducted at the time of Cook’s first voyage, had dropped off the radar until the brilliant John Dunmore produced this work based on the journals of Captain Jean de Surville and First Officer Guillaume Labe.

    Published by Hakluyt in 1981, octavo 310 pages illustrated with maps, facsimile pages from journals etc. Original blue cloth covered boards with gilt design, dust jacket, a very good copy.

    Jean- Francois- Marie de Surville (1717-1770) was a merchant captain with the French East India Company. This was his only exploratory endeavour. He died in Peru without having completed his objective. In 1769 he was given command of the Saint Jaen-Baptiste to look for trading opportunities in the Pacific. He entered the Pacific from the north west and rediscovered the Solomon Islands, then on to New Zealand where he missed crossing paths with James Cook by a matter of days. Crossing the Pacific to Peru was confident in having dismissed the existence of David Land. His crew were in a most unhealthy state with the scurvy and other ailments. He decided not to call at Juan Fernandez and sailed straight to Chlica to get help. The ocean was rough and Surville set off in a small boat which capsized, and he drowned. Command was transferred to Labe. The ship however was seized by the Spanish and held for two years before the vessel and the remaining crew were let go. Roughly one third survived to return to France.

    Despite these difficulties (understatement) the journals contain valuable information on the Solomons, observations on pre-colonial Maori society, and extraordinary picture of the hardships endured.

    Jean Surville on the St Jean Baptiste

    $40.00

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  • The Discovery of the Clarie Coast Antarctic – Dumont d’Urville – 26th January 1840

    The Discovery of the Clarie Coast Antarctic – Dumont d’Urville – 26th January 1840

    An original beautifully executed lithograph by Louis Le Breton (1818-1866) published as part of the great “Atlas Pittoresque” to accompany “Voyage au Pole Sud et dans l’Oceanie sur les corvettes l’Astrolabe et la Zelee … sous commandement de M.J. Dumont d’Urville”.

    After discovering and naming Adelie Land (After d’Urville’s wife) on the 22nd of January 1840 and making various explorations the Astrolabe and Zelee continued west in search of further land. A violent gale separated the two ships and Dumont d’Urville feared that he might have lost the Zelee. However, the sea calmed and the Zelee appeared and the vessels were re-united. Shortly afterwards the Astrolabe encountered the US Exploring Expedition under Captain Wilkes. Dumont d’Urville had heard of Wilkes’ intentions at Hobart and made all haste to make his the first discoveries … and he did so. The encounter with Wilkes was very strange and through a misunderstanding Wilkes thought his approach to the French vessel was rebuffed .. not so the French simply manoeuvred to avoid any chance of a physical encounter in these difficult waters. A couple of days later the French discovered further extensive coastline which d’Urville named Cote de Clarie or the Clarie Coast after the wife of Charles Jaquinot Captain of his support vessel Zelee. This was on 26th January 1840 and the event is recognised in this delightful lithograph. The US Wilkes expedition also found the Claire Coast, but not until February had arrived. The Americans sailed further on confirming a thousand plus mile stretch of land … likely because of this the region is known in Australia as Wilkes Land … not so in France!

    Lithographed by P Blanchard on sturdy paper – 37 x 22cm to the edge of the image with very wide margin. Overall in excellent condition.

    Price $590.00 unframed – rare

    Antarctic discovery of the Clarie Coast 26th January 1840 Voyage of Dumont d’Urville.

    $590.00

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