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Natural History

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  • Original Press Photograph – The Archbold Expedition at Mount Wilhelmina – 1939

    Original Press Photograph – The Archbold Expedition at Mount Wilhelmina – 1939

    An original photograph 22cm by 15cm of the Archbold Expedition camping at the tree line near the base of Mt Wilhelmina, Dutch New Guinea during their important biological exploring expedition of 1938/39 … the third and most ambitious of Archbold’s expeditions, under his leadership.

    Very good condition albeit usual press stampings and pasted narrative to rear.

    The narrative reads – “Exploring New Guinea by Air – Mount Wilhelmina, Netherlands New Guinea – The camp of the expedition carriers near the timber line in the shadow of Mount Wilhelmina (background) the second loftiest peak on the island, rising mor than three miles at the Equator. It was in this area that MR Archbold discovered a bird he said was hitherto unknown to science. It is slightly larger than the ordinary sparrow, with a bluish-black boy an a brilliant red patch to its throat. It has a delicate, flycatcher- type back and warbles melodically”

    Richard Archbold (1907-1976) was a wealthy American zoologist and philanthropist … his three expeditions to Dutch New Guinea were very successful, particularly this the third and final expedition. In it they concentrated mainly in the area from Mt Wilhelmina to the Idenburg River.

    Mt Wilhelmina, known as Puncak Trikora since 1963 is 4,750 metres high. It was first climbed in 1913 by Alphons Herderschee. At that time its peak was still covered by a substantial ice cap, as were a number of other high peaks in the area. During the early part of the 10th Century the ice gradually melted and had disappeared by c1940.

    The Archbold expeditions continued, under Australian leadership, after WWII and included territory in Papua New Guinea. We have the reports of these later expeditions in stock.

    Price $40.00
    Nice image of the Archbold camp New Guinea 1939.

    $40.00

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  • Antique Microscope Slide – Human Fleas – E Bryan c1900

    Antique Microscope Slide – Human Fleas – E Bryan c1900

    A very nice example prepared by E Bryan Optician of Manchester, England [Not in Bracegirdle]. Bryan operated at the premises in 24 Cross Street c1900. The slide carries his label and a brief subject description.

    Male and female examples of the human flea .. that is male and female fleas not fleas of male and female for the grammatically and scientifically challenged.

    The Human Flea (Pulex Irritans), an interesting Latin name, is happy on a number of hosts not just humans. It was thought to have originated on South American Guinea Pigs. The female burrows into the flesh particularly around the feet and ovulates internally.

    The first single flea image is the female and the second the male

    Antique He and She Flea

    $70.00

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  • The Geological Evidences of the Antiquity of Man. With an Outline of Glacial Post-tertiary Geology and Remarks on Theories of the Origin of Species with Special Reference to Man’s First Appearance on the Earth

    The Geological Evidences of the Antiquity of Man. With an Outline of Glacial Post-tertiary Geology and Remarks on Theories of the Origin of Species with Special Reference to Man’s First Appearance on the Earth

    A fourth English edition, much revised, published by John Murray in 1873. The first three being all in 1863. Thick royal octavo, 572 pages illustrated throughout. In the original binding with the gilt fossil device to front. A very good copy.

    Carries the bookplate of John David Hope, from the great Scottish Lowlands family of that name, that for centuries have made their money from banking, the law and politics and owning loads of property. Related to the first Governor General of Australia, John Adrian Hope. The family motto is a good one “At Spes Non Fracta” – “Yet my Hope is not Broken” … a little corny. The heraldic emblem includes a broken terrestrial globe above which is a rainbow emanating from clouds on either side … describes their position quite well we think.

    Scottish geologist Charles Lyell (1797-1875) brings a geological approach to this debate on the origin and age of mankind. Embracing Darwin’s theory of evolution, he references Lamarck, Chambers, Darwin, Wallace and Hooker. A comprehensive and careful review of fossil evidence with interesting evidence of man living in Europe among ancestors of elephants, rhinoceros and hippopotami. The age and development of languages in man are considered and the all important issue of the day .. could man be placed among the apes?

    Lyell in there with Darwin and Evolution

    $390.00

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  • Seven Professionally Prepared Antique Microscope Slides – Botanicals – by W. Watson

    Seven Professionally Prepared Antique Microscope Slides – Botanicals – by W. Watson

    A fine collection of antique ring mounted botanical specimens. Comprising …

    Leaf of Tea Tree
    Leaf of Aloe ferox
    Leaf of Laurel
    Leaf of Tobacco Plant
    Stem of Ribes
    Lime Tree section
    Lea bud of Ash

    Some super examples with very minimal specimen degradation as can be seen from the images.

    William Watson set up as an optician in 1837. He took up premises at 313 High Holborn, London in 1862. The business became W Watson & Sons from 1882. They took over the slide preparation business of Edmund Wheeler in 1884 and from them were to become one of the most successful preparers. These slides are circa 1900, though the Lime Tree is earlier and carries the distinctive Watson cursive style specimen label of the 1880’s.

    Note tray not included slides will be sent in protective special purpose containers.

    A good group of early quality mounts by Watson

    $140.00

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  • King Island and the Sealing Trade 1802 – Helen Micco

    King Island and the Sealing Trade 1802 – Helen Micco

    An important work regrading Tasmania’s King Island and the sealing trade at the very beginning of the 19th century.

    Put together by Helen Micco and published by Roebuck as part of their historical series. A first printing of 1971. Small quarto, 51 pages after preliminaries, 7 full page plates not included in the pagination. A particularly good copy. Carries the nicely style bookplate ex libris Gisborne Park, carefully affixed only at the top so as not to actually intrude on the endpaper map.

    Based around extracts from Francois Peron’s account of the Baudin voyage in Le Geographe and Le Naturaliste from 1800-1804 during which they visited King Island.

    After a description of the original documentation an outline of the voyage we have a translation of Peron’s work … “King Island: The Hunter Islands: The northwest part of Van Diemen’s Land. From 18th November to 27th December” 1802. And .. “History of the Sea Elephant or Trunked Seal: English fisheries in Southern Lands … the advantages that the English derive from the Seals of the Southern Lands.

    There follows a tribute to Peron and a series of Appendices including to and from Baudin and Governor King. Finishing with a useful note by Isobel Bennett of the Department of Zoology, Sydney University regarding the Australian wildlife mention in the voyage with reference to the illustration by Lesueur of which Voyager often has examples.

    King Island a magnificent place and an important part of its history.

    $40.00

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  • The Voyage of the “Scotia” – Being the Record of a Voyage of Exploration in the Antarctic Seas By R.N. Rudmose Brown, J.H.H. Pirie and R.C. Mossman

    The Voyage of the “Scotia” – Being the Record of a Voyage of Exploration in the Antarctic Seas By R.N. Rudmose Brown, J.H.H. Pirie and R.C. Mossman

    A facsimile of the rare first published by Blackwood and Sons, Edinburgh in 1906. This edition by MacClelland and Stewart, Toronto 1978.

    The original small quarto this octavo, 375 pages with numerous illustrations and a chart of the track of the Scotia; a map of Laurie Island South Orkneys and a large folding chart at the rear … Bathymetrical Survey of the South Atlantic Ocean and the Weddell Sea. A fine copy. The piper on the front is naturalist Burn Murdoch … the first person to play the bagpipes on the Antarctic … and also in the Arctic … quiet an achievement.

    With an additional forward by Sir George Deacon which adds greatly to our understanding of the expedition leader William Spiers Bruce and his colleagues who were joint authors of this account

    William Spiers Bruce (1867-1921) was born in Edinburgh and was Scotland’s greatest polar scientist and oceanographer. His greatest accomplishment is recorded in this account, leading the Scottish National Antarctic Expedition (1902-1904) to the South Orkney Islands and the Weddell Sea, where they conducted the first oceanographic explorations and discovered the northern part of the Caird Coast. They established the first permanent weather station in the Antarctic. Bruce would not write the popular account of the expedition so it fell to his three lieutenants to write this much admired work.

    Bruce had previously been on the Dundee Whaling Expedition (1892) having given up medical studies to participate. In between he participated in Arctic Voyages to Novaya Zemlya, Spitsbergen and Franz Josef Land. He wanted to joined Scott’s Discovery Expedition but it is said that he fell out with Markham and therefore organised his own Scottish expedition. He was a good friend of Mawson and provided gear towards Mawson’s later expedition.

    The Scottish expedition, and early one with significant achievements often overlooked.

    $120.00

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