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  • The Pagan Trinity – Beatrice Irwin – First Edition 1912 – Presentation Copy to “Cheiro”

    The Pagan Trinity – Beatrice Irwin – First Edition 1912 – Presentation Copy to “Cheiro”

    An unusual book of poetry dedicated to French artist sculptor Auguste Rodin. The opening poem inspired by Rodin…” The Hand of God”

    Presentation copy inscribed boldly “To Count Louis Hamon with best regards from Beatrice Irwin Feb 15 /12” … the recipient was also known as Cheiro, a famous cheiromancer (palmist) and author of sought after works on that subject.

    A first edition published by John Lane, The Bodley Head, London in 1912. Octavo, 144 pages half vellum binding with nice marbled paper covered boards, top edge gilt. A nice copy with the super dedication.

    A volume of mystical verse reflecting the poet / actress’s interest in colour – music – poetry relationships, then very fashionable in Europe, America, and Russia through the works of Alexander Scriabin. Irwin Beatrice also know as Lady Rosslyn a spiritualist and followed of the Baha’i faith. Virginia Woolf described the style as neo-Paganism and of significance. Her theatrical career was extensive and included a season in Australia in 1907 when she played in Brewster’s Millions in Sydney and Melbourne. Her views on colour were sophisticated and well known … she influenced Australian artists in that regard including Roy de Maistre.

    The book is arranged in under the following descriptions … Plastic poems; Colour poems; Tone Poems; The Music of Japan and Songs of the Elements. We like it.

    Cheiro, or Count Hamon was born William John Warner in Ireland in 1866. He became an internationally renown clairvoyant, palmist, numerologist … anything occult. He read for so many of the famous including Mark Twain, Sarah Bernhardt, Eddison etc. To read about some of his predictions will surprise. It is no surprise however that he had a connection with the mystical Beatrice Irwin.

    Mystical poetry by the colourful Beatrice Irwin – Cheiro’s copy nicely inscribed.

    $160.00

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  • Silvester Diggles – Australian Birds – Pied Honey-eater, Slender-billed Spine-bill and the White eye-browed Spine-bill

    Silvester Diggles – Australian Birds – Pied Honey-eater, Slender-billed Spine-bill and the White eye-browed Spine-bill

    Rare original hand-coloured lithograph by Queensland naturalist Silvester Diggles. Published as part of his magnificent work “”The Ornithology of Australia” between 1866 and 1870 in twenty-one parts by Pugh of Brisbane, in a very limited edition. By the time part sixteen was published there were only 92 subscribers. The original plates were executed by Diggles and his niece, Rowena Birkett.

    The work measures 38cm by 27cm, good hand colouring pretty clean with just the odd surface mark. A really scarce item.

    Silvester Diggles (1817-1880) artist and musician born in Liverpool, England. He came to Australia in 1853 settling in Brisbane where he taught music and drawing. Diggles was a founder of the Brisbane Choral Society in 1859 and the Philharmonic Society in 1861 known as “the father of music in Brisbane”. Diggles was also a founder of the Queensland Philosophical Society and helped establish the Museum. His greatest work was The Ornithology of Australia. However it nearly sent him broke. His health deteriorated worry about finances being a factor. He died at Kangaroo Point in 1880.

    Price $240.00 unframed

    An opportunity to own a rare original bird print by Queenslander Silvester Diggles

    $240.00

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  • The Peculiar Use and Signification of Certain Words in the Latin Tongue: or, a Collection of Observations, wherein the Elegant, and Commonly Unobserv’d Sense of very near Nine Hundred Common Latin Words. William Willymott – 1713

    A scholarly book from the early eighteenth century. One that could give any reader a leg forward in the intellectual stakes.

    Published by R Bonwick printed at the Cambridge University Press in 1713. A second edition. Scarce.

    Octavo, 4, 374 pages bound in original full panelled sheep, spine with raised bands, chips to ends. Some long gone worming to the margin of a few of the last leaves, otherwise a pretty good copy.

    We have no date of birth but William Willymott die in 1737. He was born at Royston, Cambridgeshire and educated at Eton and then Kings College, Cambridge were he graduated B.A,; M.A. and L.L.D. by 1707. He was made a Fellow. He became an usher at Eton and then found Isleworth Private School .. he was suspected as having an attachment to the Pretender which hampered his career. He considered law but changed his mind and took orders … the rectory Milton near Cambridge. He died at the Swann Inn at Bedford … not a bad pub.

    Overcome your Latin deficiencies with Willymott – 1713

    $240.00

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  • Horne and Thornthwaite Field Microscope – Triple compound objective – 1874

    Horne and Thornthwaite Field Microscope – Triple compound objective – 1874

    A Victorian field or students drum microscope by one of the most important London based makers and retailers of optical instruments in the 19th Century Horne and Thornthwaite. Carries their stamp inside the lid when they were at Holborn Viaduct which can be pinned down to 1874, having moved from Newgate the year before moving to upmarket premises in the Strand the year after.

    The business sold microscope, telescopes, cameras, chemicals and laboratory equipment from 1844 until 1911. The history of the business is fascinating but unfortunately too much to go into here. There is an excellent summary online .. we can direct any interested parties.

    The microscope on offer is in very good if not better condition. The condition of the lacquer is possibly the best we have seen. The optics are pretty good and the compounding objectives combine nicely, swivel mirror unblemished. The original mahogany box has its original clips and eyelets and shows little ageing or patina on the lid. Internally undamaged. Comes with what look like original specimen tweezers.

    Super condition field microscope – known relevant maker retailer.

    $260.00

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  • “Cowslips” – Original Multi Coloured Woodcut – by Australian born Hall Thorpe – 1922

    One for the collector. A striking example of a desirable woodcut by Australian born Hall Thorpe.

    A very good bright impression, signed in pencil below the image. Thick wove paper 27cm by 23cm, printed area 16.5cm by 15.2cm. A lovely example. Authority on Hall Thorpe, Richard King (see Voyager listing) reference no 10. This work was completed in 1922.

    Hall Thorpe (1874-1947) was born in Victoria, Australia. In the 1890’s he was apprenticed to John Fairfax as an engraver for the Sydney Mail. He was pretty good. In 1902 he moved to England and commenced further study at the Heatherly School of Art, Chelsea. He honed his skill in woodblocks holding his first one-man show in London in 1918. It was a great success and by the early 1920’s he had gained an enviable reputation for woodblock floral still life. He printed each example himself ensuring consistency and standard. Operating first from a studio in Redcliffe Square, he then moved into gallery space in South Kensington. As well as the UK they were popular in the USA and France

    Original signed Hall Thorpe Woodcut – Cowslips.

    $360.00

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  • Epitolae Medicanales Variis Occasionibus Conscriptae – Ricardo Carr – 1691

    Epitolae Medicanales Variis Occasionibus Conscriptae – Ricardo Carr – 1691

    A first edition of this scarce 17th Century collection of medical instruction by Richard Carr MD published by Anson Stafford, London in 1691.

    Small octavo, 12, 200,6 pages, bound in full period leather, some wear, cracked hinges holding well, very clean inside, a very good copy of a rare medical work.

    Richard Carr was born in Lincolnshire, educated at Louth Grammar School and then Magdalene College, Cambridge. He entered Cambridge, shortly after Newton, as a sizar in 1667, graduated BA in 1670 and MA in 1674. He then became Master of the Saffron Walden Grammar. In 1683 he went to Leyden to study Physic and then back to Cambridge for his MD in 1686. He was created a Fellow of the College of Physicians by James II Charter, admitted in 1687.

    {Note a “sizar” was a special arrangement at Cambridge whereby food lodgings etc could be obtained for free by the sizar completing some lowly task such as serving food to others etc … Newton was also a form of sizar called a subsizer]

    This book is his main recognised work; it is dedicated to the College of Physicians.

    The book contains eighteen “epistles” written in a readable popular style as if addressed to patients rather than physicians. They are in Latin. The first epistle deals with the use of sneezing powders, the second smoking tobacco and numerous others relate to dietetics including a strong suggestion that it is most healthy to get blind drunk once a month. The virtues of the Tonbridge and Bath waters are discussed as well as the remedial effects of a trip to Montpellier for phthisis. He reflects on the “struma” and notes that King Charles II touched over ninety two thousand people between 1660 and 1682 and respectfully doubts they all got well. His third epistle deals with the coffee-houses … not a modern phenomena … referring to coffee, thee, twist (a mixture of both), salvia and chocolate.

    Wise Medical Advice from Cambridge Physician Richard Carr – 1691

    $460.00

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