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Non-fiction

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  • The Convict Settlers of Australia – Robson

    The Convict Settlers of Australia – Robson

    A first edition of this respected book on the subject. Published by the Melbourne University Press in 1965. Octavo, 257 pages, numerous tables of data included as appendices.

    We are encouraged by the author to go through the tables in the appendices first before reading the book which is based up a statistical sample derived by way of the informative tables.

    The body of the book seeks to define what sort of people made up the mass of the convicts transported and what sort of life they led in Australia. Conclusions that cannot be drawn from google search.

    The Australian Convict population analysed and defined.

    $30.00

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  • Tasmanian Aboriginal Place Names – N.J.B. Plomley

    Tasmanian Aboriginal Place Names – N.J.B. Plomley

    Published in the early 1990’s by the Queen Victoria Museum, Launceston, where Plomley was at the time an Honorary Research Assistant and the University of Tasmania. Described as their “Occasional Paper No 3”. Hard to find a copy.

    Printed internally on A4 sized paper, ninety-eight pages, staple bound, binder’s tape, orange heavy card covers, Cover image in red from rock carvings at Marrawah, Northwest Tasmania. Fine and clean.

    After a brief introduction there are ninety plus pages of Aboriginal place names. Many with possible alternative pronunciations, references and in some cases admissions that the location is not yet (then) known. A brief reverse index appears at the end for those that want to trace back English names to their former true name. Bibliography.

    A worthy task would be to revisit those locations where the “location” remains unresolved and well resolve them.

    Tasmanian Aboriginal place names – get used to them …

    $50.00

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  • The Tasmanian Tribes & Cicatrices as Tribal Indicators among the Tasmania Aborigines – N.J.B. Plomley

    The Tasmanian Tribes & Cicatrices as Tribal Indicators among the Tasmania Aborigines – N.J.B. Plomley

    Published in the early 1990’s by the Queen Victoria Museum, Launceston, where Plomley was at the time an Honorary Research Assistant and the University of Tasmania. Described as their “Occasional Paper No 5”. Hard to find a copy.

    Printed internally on A4 sized paper, seventy-one pages, staple bound, binder’s tape, yellow heavy card covers, Image of Alphonse the Tasmanian – Mannalargenna from an engraving by Napier. Fine and clean.

    The two subjects split evenly. The work on the tribes is excellent, based in part on the records of Robinson. Wrapped up as an appendix to this section is a listing of tribes [of which there are al least fifty-seven clearly identified] by their names and alternative names, location, and some worthy comments.

    Cicatrices on the bodies of Tasmanian Aboriginals were noticed by Marion de Frene in 1772 and the European explorer thereafter. However, no consideration was given to them being an indication of tribal connections. Here Plomley analyses the early literature and has the benefit of some amazing, detailed engravings of the period.

    Not tattoos, cicatrices are created by cutting the flesh with a sharp flint and rubbing charcoal into the wound creating raised scars

    Plomley his curiosity and depth of study has created a wealth of useful information.

    $50.00

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  • The Aboriginal / Settler Clash in Van Diemen’s Land 1803-1831 – N.J.B. Plomley

    The Aboriginal / Settler Clash in Van Diemen’s Land 1803-1831 – N.J.B. Plomley

    Published in 1992 by the Queen Victoria Museum, Launceston, where Plomley was at the time an Honorary Research Assistant and the University of Tasmania. Described as their “Occasional Paper No 6”. Very hard to find a copy.

    Printed internally on what A4 sized paper, one hundred pages, staple bound, binder’s tape, cream heavy card covers, image to front on a conflict ex Bonwick. Fine and clean.

    The structure of the work is interesting, twenty-six pages of narrative, bibliography, tables of Aboriginal population, rather sad graphs of the decline and the level of incidents which peaked in 1830, numerous maps of Tasmania showing the location of clashes and a lengthy table of the nature of those clashed.

    Sobering history not to be ignored …

    $50.00

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  • Tasmania’s Struggle for Power – A.J. Gillies

    Tasmania’s Struggle for Power – A.J. Gillies

    An unusual little soft cover which for some reason commands higher prices than we would expect on the usual websites. We have not followed that route.

    Published by Michael and Christine Lillas in Burnie in 1984. Octavo, 169 pages plus unpaginated appendix, some illustration, rather old-fashioned typesetting consistent with it effectively self-published style.

    The title may be slightly tongue in cheek as we are talking about electrical power here not political, our preference, rather have the lights than the (insert rhyming slang).

    The first good power in Tasmania arrived 1888 when the proprietor, Hogarth, installed a water driven turbine. The idea had come to him following a trip to Scotland. He only got enough electricity for the lights not the machines, but this was still a first on a number of fronts.

    The bulk of the book is about the establishment of the first serious power generation at the great lakes and the building of dams and infrastructure to create the head of water. And the subsequent development of the zinc smelting industry which could not have arisen without the former.

    The real power behind Tasmania

    $30.00

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  • To Hell or to Hobart – A New Insight into Irish Convict History – Patrick Howard

    To Hell or to Hobart – A New Insight into Irish Convict History – Patrick Howard

    Published by Kangaroo Press in 1994, a soft cover edition in fine condition. Octavo, 199 pages, illustrated throughout.

    The author the great grandson of Irish convicts Stephen Howard and Ellen Lydon who were transported to Van Diemen’s Land in 1843 and 1849 respectively. Stephen had stolen a gun from a landowner and Ellen and her family had been caught stealing a sheep during a time of high famine.

    This book is a joy. We first get the “’back history” the situation in Ireland both generally and specifically to Stephen and Ellen. The offences, the trial, the jails, the transportation. Time in Tasmania as convicts and their eventual release or ticket of leave. There striving to survive, success and the successes of subsequent generations …

    One Irish Convict family in depth but much deeper than that ..

    $25.00

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