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Maritime

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  • Tek Sing Shipwreck Treasure – 1822

    Tek Sing Shipwreck Treasure – 1822

    Qing Dynasty decorated bowl recovered by Mike Hatcher from the Tek Sing shipwreck. A very good completely undamaged example.

    Beautifully and quite intensely decorated with peony flowers to the centre and rim, the latter in decorative band. Stylised flowers under rim and a blue line circling the foot. Strong colouring.

    One of the larger bowls 15.5 cm in diameter 3.5 cm high. Retains the original Nagel auction sticker and catalogue reference underneath, which provides clear provenance.

    Price $240.00
    Bright well decorated shipwreck bowl
    ________________________

    The Tek Sing Shipwreck – Background

    The Tek Sing (Chinese for “Bright Star”’) was a large Chinese Junk which sank in 1822 in the South China Sea at the Belvidere Shoals. She was 50 meters long, 10 metres wide and weighed a thousand tons. Manned by a crew of 200. The great loss of life has led to the Tek Sing being referred to as the “Titanic of the East”.

    Sailing from the port of Amoy (now Xiamen), the Tek Sing was bound for Jakarta, with a cargo of porcelain goods and 1,600 Chinese immigrants. After a month of sailing, Captain Lo Tauko took a shortcut through the Gaspar Straits and ran aground on a reef and sank in 100 feet of water.

    The next morning and English East Indiaman captained by James Pearl sailing from Indonesia to Borneo passed through the Gaspar Straits. He found debris from the sunken Chinese vessel and survivors. They managed to rescue 190 people.

    In 1999, marine salvor Mike Hatcher discovered the wreck. His crew raised what has been described as the largest cache of Chinese porcelain ever recovered. It was auctioned by Nagle in Stuttgart, Germany the following year

    $240.00

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  • The Discovery of the Torres Strait; Arctic Glacier Cap; Crete and the Gulf Stream – Journal of the Royal Geographical Society – August 1941.

    The Discovery of the Torres Strait; Arctic Glacier Cap; Crete and the Gulf Stream – Journal of the Royal Geographical Society – August 1941.

    The Journal of the Royal Geographical Society, November 1914, containing an important paper by “A.R.H.” regarding, from a western perspective, the discovery of the Torres Strait.

    In 1928 Sotheby had sold a collection of Spanish manuscripts one being .. a “Relacion sumaria of the discovery begun by Pero Fernandez de Quiros and completed for him by Captain Don Deiego de Prado with the help of Captain Luis Baes de Torres … a document in Prado’s handwriting .. and a document that turned out to change the then held view.

    Also, we have an excellent nicely illustrated paper on the Arctic Glaciers .. the West Ice of North East Land … including the Franklin Glacier.

    A travel account relating to Crete takes us back to warmer weather.

    Usual blue wrappers period adverts etc, illustrated with maps and images from original photographs.

    The Prado manuscript changed it all re the discovery of the Torres Strait

    $70.00

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  • Tall Ships and Sailormen – A Concise Survey of Victoria’s early Maritime History – J. K. Loney.

    Tall Ships and Sailormen – A Concise Survey of Victoria’s early Maritime History – J. K. Loney.

    Self published by the irreplaceable Jack Loney who knew everything maritime everything shipwreck there was to know.

    Soft cover, 100 pages with an unusual unpaginated inset of 18 pages with images from photographs .. this may be an addition to the book … printed on smaller paper stock. Bar that, further illustrations, maps, charts etc.

    The usual Loney comprehensive approach covering … Bully Forbes; Lure of Gold; Steamships; Tragic Loch Line; Mosquito Fleets; Hulks and Lighters. And, under “Making History” … Sealing and Whaling; Ghosts at the Rip; West Coast Mysteries; Smugglers; Shenandoah Incident etc etc.

    Even to keep you going for a few wintery nights and at least one round of “Mastermind”

    Loney summarising Victoria … and there is a lot of it!

    $30.00

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  • Richard Siddins of Port Jackson [Australian Maritime History] – Lyndon Rose.

    Richard Siddins of Port Jackson [Australian Maritime History] – Lyndon Rose.

    Published by Roebuck in 1984 a nice production, larger format, 152 pages, Illustrated, end paper maps. A very good copy.

    Richard Siddins was a merchant sea captain who sailed out of Port Jackson from 1804 to 1822. He operated sealing expeditions to the Antarctic Oceans; gathered sandalwood; carried cargo to India and China. Within all this he experienced more adventure seeking gold from a wrecked privateer; taking care at a cannibal feast; chased by Tongan war canoes; wrecked off Macquarie Island … it was all in a day’s work for Captain Siddins.

    Hinted above amongst all this was an important early voyage to the South Shetland Islands.

    Early Australian Maritime History.

    $35.00

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  • Cook’s Final Voyage – The Journal of Midshipman George Gilbert – Introduced by Christine Holmes.

    Cook’s Final Voyage – The Journal of Midshipman George Gilbert – Introduced by Christine Holmes.

    Published by Brian Clouston, Caliban Books in 1982, a first edition in this form. Also published in Hawaii.

    Large octavo, 158 pages, nicely illustrated. A near fine copy.

    Yet another source of exceptional information on the third, final and fateful voyage of James Cook. Due to James Cook’s discipline the Midshipman on his voyages kept impeccable journals. With a focus on the Central Pacific and up into the Arctic searching for the North-West Passage from the other side.

    The Third Voyage through Gilbert’s Eyes

    $40.00

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  • The Henty Journals – A Record of Farming, Whaling and Shipping in Portland Bay, 1834-1839. – Lynnette Peel

    The Henty Journals – A Record of Farming, Whaling and Shipping in Portland Bay, 1834-1839. – Lynnette Peel

    A super copy of this first edition well produced book published by The Miegunyah Press in 1966.

    Large octavo, 297 pages, nicely illustrated. A fine copy and as always with the Miegunyah Press nothing spared, printed on Pageantry Text Creme paper, limited to a thousand copies.

    The Henty family left Sussex in England in the 1820’s to make their life in Australia. With farms first in Western Australia and Tasmania they settled at Portland Bay in Victoria. Edward Henty is recognised as the first permanent settler in Victoria. Diaries written by Edward and his brother Francis are a prized possession of the State Library of Victoria. They form the basis of this book. Brother Thomas settled at Launceston in Tasmania and bred Marino sheep often selling to the Macarthurs of Camden. Not restricting their activities to the land they undertook maritime and whaling adventures and sadly had a hand in reducing the population of the Southern Right Whale.

    The Diaries of the brothers Henty – a genuine glimpse into life in the early 19thC.

    $80.00

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