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  • Tek Sing Shipwreck Treasure [Peony and Magnolia] – 1822

    Tek Sing Shipwreck Treasure [Peony and Magnolia] – 1822

    Qing Dynasty decorated bowl recovered by Mike Hatcher from the Tek Sing shipwreck. A lovely example.

    Beautifully and quite fully decorated with peony flowers and magnolias and, maybe what is a rock-wall at centre. Three Lingzhi fungus sprays under rim, blue glaze circles under rim and around foot. Strong colouring. A small nicely curved bowl 10.5 cm in diameter 2.5 cm high. Retains the Nagel auction and catalogue stickers underneath for provenance.

    Super example of a Tek Sing shipwreck bowl
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    The Tek Sing Shipwreck – Background

    The Tek Sing (Chinese for “Bright Star”’) was a large Chinese Junk which sank in 1822 in the South China Sea at the Belvidere Shoals. She was 50 meters long, 10 metres wide and weighed a thousand tons. Manned by a crew of 200. The great loss of life has led to the Tek Sing being referred to as the “Titanic of the East”.

    Sailing from the port of Amoy (now Xiamen), the Tek Sing was bound for Jakarta, with a cargo of porcelain goods and 1,600 Chinese immigrants. After a month of sailing, Captain Lo Tauko took a shortcut through the Gaspar Straits and ran aground on a reef and sank in 100 feet of water.

    The next morning and English East Indiaman captained by James Pearl sailing from Indonesia to Borneo passed through the Gaspar Straits. He found debris from the sunken Chinese vessel and survivors. They managed to rescue 190 people.

    In 1999, marine salvor Mike Hatcher discovered the wreck. His crew raised what has been described as the largest cache of Chinese porcelain ever recovered. It was auctioned by Nagle in Stuttgart, Germany the following year

    $150.00

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  • Titans of the Barrier Reef [Further Adventures of a Shark Fisherman] – Norman Caldwell – First Edition 1938

    Titans of the Barrier Reef [Further Adventures of a Shark Fisherman] – Norman Caldwell – First Edition 1938

    A nice first edition of the follow up book to Fangs of the Sea by shark hunter extraordinaire Norman Caldwell

    Published by Angus and Robertson, Sydney in 1938. Thick octavo, 248 pages, illustrated throughout with images from original photographs of the “’catch” and the odd snake etc, end paper maps. Missing the dust jacket but rare as is in emerald original green cloth covered binding, very slightly cocked, very clean inside a very good copy.

    Still hunting along the east coast of Australia, mainly in Queensland on the Barrier Reef from the Whitsundays up to Caldwell. An unusual in the moment narrative like its predecessor, sometime drifting into a story telling style in the manner of Idriess. Fascinating “sharky” encounters and the odd 500plus pound Grouper, as in “Fangs”. Photographic images are classic … Caldwell had a rather strange passion of photographing his wife with the caught beauties, posing in a sometimes unusual fashion.

    Caldwell the Shark Hunter more than just Fangs

    $140.00

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  • Tek Sing Shipwreck Treasure – 1822

    Tek Sing Shipwreck Treasure – 1822

    Qing Dynasty decorated bowl recovered by Mike Hatcher from the Tek Sing shipwreck. A very good completely undamaged example.

    Beautifully and quite intensely decorated with peony flowers to the centre and rim, the latter in decorative band. Stylised flowers under rim and a blue line circling the foot. Strong colouring.

    One of the larger bowls 15.5 cm in diameter 3.5 cm high. Retains the original Nagel auction sticker and catalogue reference underneath, which provides clear provenance.

    Price $240.00
    Bright well decorated shipwreck bowl
    ________________________

    The Tek Sing Shipwreck – Background

    The Tek Sing (Chinese for “Bright Star”’) was a large Chinese Junk which sank in 1822 in the South China Sea at the Belvidere Shoals. She was 50 meters long, 10 metres wide and weighed a thousand tons. Manned by a crew of 200. The great loss of life has led to the Tek Sing being referred to as the “Titanic of the East”.

    Sailing from the port of Amoy (now Xiamen), the Tek Sing was bound for Jakarta, with a cargo of porcelain goods and 1,600 Chinese immigrants. After a month of sailing, Captain Lo Tauko took a shortcut through the Gaspar Straits and ran aground on a reef and sank in 100 feet of water.

    The next morning and English East Indiaman captained by James Pearl sailing from Indonesia to Borneo passed through the Gaspar Straits. He found debris from the sunken Chinese vessel and survivors. They managed to rescue 190 people.

    In 1999, marine salvor Mike Hatcher discovered the wreck. His crew raised what has been described as the largest cache of Chinese porcelain ever recovered. It was auctioned by Nagle in Stuttgart, Germany the following year

    $240.00

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  • Cannibal Jack – The True Autobiography of a White Man in the South Seas [Fiji] – by William Diapea.

    Title goes on … printed from a manuscript in the possession of Rev James Hadfield

    A first edition published by Faber & Gwyer, London in 1928. Very scarce book. Octavo, 242 pages, frontispiece of the ledger holding the manuscript, end paper maps, facsimile of a page from the manuscript.

    A forward by Henry Stacpoole who wrote much about the region and an Introduction by James Hadfield and further a Publisher’s Note providing additional information about the subject cannibal received during the setting of the book.

    Cannibal Jack Spent some time in the Solomons and also in Fiji where most of this account is set. There is recorded in other literary quarters arguments for and against whether William Diapea actually partook in cannibal rituals. He certainly lived an exciting life quite diverse from the normal western life of the late 19th Century. But was he a cannibal .. we will leave you to decide.

    Cannibal Jack a legend in his own lunchtime …

    SO SORRY SOLD

    $70.00

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  • A Pictorial History of The railway & Tramways of Western Australia – Ronald Aubrey.

    A Pictorial History of The railway & Tramways of Western Australia – Ronald Aubrey.

    Effectively self published at the OBM Bookshop, Hobart in 1975. The author a resident of Zeehan in Western Tasmania, in the very heart of this historic account.

    Soft cover, large format, 52 pages, back covers a little edge nibbled, otherwise a very good copy. Ninety seven images from period photographs of the trains and trams make this a special record.

    Through the early mining development of this remote region a number of lines were built and the book covers them all .. Emu Bay to Mt Bischoff; the Waratah Tramway; the Magnet Tramway; Tullah Tramway; My Lyell and Zeeham Railways etc etc

    A special local history – see our broader collection of Industrial History in Tasmania

    $40.00

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  • Firegrates and Kitchen Ranges – Eveleigh

    Firegrates and Kitchen Ranges – Eveleigh

    From the Shire Album series. Whilst based on records, images and hardware residing in England, this has good Australian appeal for those with period house of a liking for ironmongery of the practical and aesthetic sort.

    Published in 1983, decorated card covers, 32 pages, it’s the forty plus images and descriptions that make this a special little jigger … we love.

    Time to rip out than stainless steel Harvey Norman monstrosity and get a proper oven!

    A Grate Little Book!

    $20.00

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