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  • A Unique Document: Flying Saucers Over Papua   A Report on Papuan Unidentified Flying Objects.  Rev’d Norman E.G. Cruttwell of the Anglican Mission, Manapi, Papua New Guinea. March 1960

    A Unique Document: Flying Saucers Over Papua A Report on Papuan Unidentified Flying Objects. Rev’d Norman E.G. Cruttwell of the Anglican Mission, Manapi, Papua New Guinea. March 1960

    Typewritten document with sketches of flying saucers, tables of information etc. Foolscap,45 pages stapled in corner. This is a contemporary copied document. We cannot locate the original or any other copies and consequently this may well be a unique item, a classic UFO record.

    In June 1959 Rev William Gill witnessed the most extraordinary contact with a UFO at Boainai Mission on the north-east coast of Papua. Previously he had reports of UFO sightings by Stephen Moi a mission teacher – he was sceptical. On the 26th June in the early evening standing in front of his house he saw a brilliant light which descended towards him. He was joined by witnesses. The object came to within three hundred feet and remained stationary . It was circular with a wide base and narrow upper structure and two sets of protruding legs. Periodically a shaft of blue light emanated from the centre. A human-like figure appeared, joined by three others. Father Gill described them in his notes as “men”. They watched the UFO for several minutes before if disappeared in the clouds. An hour later another smaller craft was seen over the sea and then another over Wadobuna Village. Twenty minutes later the larger craft reappeared and stayed for half an hour, the smaller craft coming and going. The next day discussion were held and observations continued that evening. The larger craft returned and the human like figure appeared. Gill waved and figure waved back. They beckoned it to land and it hovered close to the ground before disappearing at speed.

    Gill sent his notes to Cruttwell who sent a report to the London, Flying Saucer Review. As a result Crutwell was appointed local investigator for the International. U.F.O. Observer Corps.

    Crutwell commenced research into Papuan sightings the first modern day sighting being in 1958 … an event covered up by the Australian Military. This typed report is a summary of his extensive findings. The chapter headings give you some idea of the depth … Sightings before 1958; 1958 The Overture; 1959 “Tilley Lamps in the Sky”; Kaleidoscopic Light; The Visitation at Boainai; Corroboration from Giwa and Baniara; Strange Craft over Menapi; More Spherical Objects and Others; The Last Sightings of the Year; Have We any Clues? The Appendices are remarkable … Their Concentration in Area; Their Distribution in Time; The Close Knit Nature of the Sightings … And tables and graphs … Summary of Papuan Sightings; Graph of Monthly Frequency; Daily Frequency; Times of Sightings; Table of Localities; Table of UFO Types; Names of Principal Witnesses.

    Unique comprehensive work on the Papuan UFO Sightings of 1958

    Rev Gill communicates with Aliens …

    ON HOLD FOR VALUED CUSTOMER

    $290.00

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  • Manuscript Letter (A Complaint) from Sir Erasmus Ommanney (First to Find Evidence of Franklin) to Hepworth Dixon (Notable Literary Identity) – 14th May 1870

    Manuscript Letter (A Complaint) from Sir Erasmus Ommanney (First to Find Evidence of Franklin) to Hepworth Dixon (Notable Literary Identity) – 14th May 1870

    Erasmus Ommanney (1814-1904) was an extraordinary individual from one of those sorts of families. He was born in 1824 seventh son of Sir Francis Molyneux Ommanney. In 1836 he went to Baffin’s Bay with Sir James Ross … he was second in command on the Franklin searching expedition and was the first to find traces of Franklin’s ships in 1850. He travelled over 500 miles on sledge to find the Franklin traces at Beechey Island. During this adventure he gathered much geographical information.

    In 1854, on commencement of the Crimean War, he commanded a Squadron in the White Sea and engaged a Russian flotilla off the mouth of the Dwin that year … later the Committee at the Royal Geographical Society … Royal Society, Royal Astronomical society (Observed the transit of Venus at Luxor in 1874)… Knighted etc for Arctic services.

    The recipient possibly equally well known in literary circles, historian and traveller Hepworth Dixon (1821-1879). A controversial writer at that. He was active in organising London’s Great Exhibition of 1851.

    Two pages in a strong clear hand from 6 Talbot Square … a nice London address. Marked clearly Private. Erasmus is obviously not happy … he had previously written to Hepworth Dixon and clearly provided some personal information about his naval conduct (about which we believe he had been criticised … he was pretty heavy handed in the White Sea) and Dixon had published these “private letter” in the press.

    “I was at the point of replying to your last note when I was surprised to find you had published my letters to you in the Newspapers, I believe it is always customary on such occasions first to obtain the sanction of the writer”

    Erasmus goes on … “My object in criticising your representations of my conduct at Solaretet was simply to induce you to add … comments, in your next edition of “Free Russia” … to show that your countrymen were justified in punishing … and that we did not bombard a defenceless … ; and I was going to enquire that you would not publish my [this] letter but evenly take the substance of my information for your guidance”

    Erasmus continues … not happy … “ As you have published my letters in the daily papers I must abide by the unpleasant announcements of the press, – there are various considerations to be dwelt on before an Officer writes on matters of a national and public nature in the newspapers; and in the present instance my letters should not have appeared.”

    Erasmus turns up the heat … “As you have forwarded a copy of your work to the Emperor of Prussia, I have greater cause to feel dissatisfied with you colouring of my conduct in the Solowitch affair, which on the while I fear injurious to my reputation. I hope that the subject will not appear again in the papers”

    Cranky letter from Victorian Naval hero and Adventurer who has had his reputation challenged in the Press

    $180.00

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  • “Wrinkles” or Hints to Sportsmen and Travellers upon Dress, Equipment, Armament & Camp Life – By H.A.L “the Old  Shekarry” … Henry Astbury Leveson. – First Edition 1868.

    “Wrinkles” or Hints to Sportsmen and Travellers upon Dress, Equipment, Armament & Camp Life – By H.A.L “the Old Shekarry” … Henry Astbury Leveson. – First Edition 1868.

    A rare first edition of this excellent guide for gentleman travellers and sportsmen.

    Octavo, 294 pages, plus lengthy catalogue, published by Saunders, Otley & Co, Brook Street, London in 1868. Re-cased in original binding with gilt design to front. All up a very good copy of a scarce item.

    Henry Astbury Leveson (1828-1875) was a bit of a gent. Commissioned into the Honourable East India Company at the age of 17. Fought in the Crimea in the Ottoman Cavalry and several other more unusual skirmishes. Between wars he spent much time travelling in Africa and Asia big game hunting and unfortunately shot most things.

    A nicely illustrated book and when reading you can see how helpful it must have been to the wanabee explorer traveller full of information, hints and tips and maybe some placed advertisements. Contents start with “Upon Dress” and flow to Equipment; Sporting and Military Armament; with Practical Hints on the Use of the Rifle; Tents and Encampments. Among the “Hints” chapters we see Hints for Naturalists – Directions for Collecting and Preserving Specimens, Closing with a chapter on “the Forest and the Mountain”

    No better guide to “enjoyment” and survival in Darkest Africa and Deepest Asia

    ON HOLD

    $180.00

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  • Antarctic Manual – E. E. Hedblom

    Antarctic Manual – E. E. Hedblom

    Prepared and published under the auspices of the U.S. Naval Medical School by Captain Hedblom of the Department of Cold Weather Medicine.

    Published in June 1960, a second edition and a year before Hedblom’s expanded work “Polar Manual”

    The author held a number of distinguished relevant positions including Staff Surgeon, Commander Naval Support Force Antarctica 1955-1959.

    Quarto, 64 pages after preliminaries. Stapled in soft covers, very good condition. From the library of Antarctic Scientist P Arnaud, but without his mark … although there is there is an institutional stamp from which it may have been borrowed, or purchased.

    Sound advice under the following general headings … Living Conditions (Geography, Shelter, Heating); Selection of Personnel; Hygiene; Clothing; Nutrition; Sanitation; Visual Disabilities; Cold Injuries; Carbon Monoxide Poisoning; First Aid; Survival; Polar Do’s and Don’ts; Antarctic Mortality; Basic Medical supplies and a relevant Bibliography.

    Makes for interesting reading and not just for the medically inclined. We learned that for sure if lost one should stay in the same place and wait to be found … but keep moving … and aircraft accident are the biggest cause of death so stay out of the sky. Alcohol at this time still highly recommended but gin was the recommended tipple.

    Get prepared for your next Antarctic trip ..

    $65.00

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  • Platypus Hand Coloured Copper Engraving – Schmuzer – 1798

    Platypus Hand Coloured Copper Engraving – Schmuzer – 1798

    Original hand coloured copper engraving of the Platypus by Schumzer for Gottlieb Tobias Wilhelm. It was produced for Wilhelm’s “Discourses in Natural history”.

    Wilhelm (1758-1811) was a Protestant Pastor born to an engraver and publisher in Augsburg, Germany. He began his great work on natural history in 1792. It was printed by his father and issued in installments. This engraving by Jacob Schmuzer was completed in 1798 and is clearly based on the image in Hunter’s First Fleet Journal.

    Price $270.00 framed in Voyager Natural History style … enquire if you would like this item unframed …

    Very early Platypus Engraving from the late 18th Century

    $270.00

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  • Polar Medal – Erwin Springweiler – 1941

    Polar Medal – Erwin Springweiler – 1941

    A Polar commemorative golden bronze medal sculpted by Erwin Springweiler and issued by the American Society of Medalists in 1941.

    73 mm in diameter weighing 160 gms a fine bright unpolished example. The Arctic side has a proud Polar Bear on a floe with Snow Geese flying in the background and the names Greely, Bartlett, Peary and Byrd celebrated. The Antarctic four proud Penguins with the names Palmer, Wilkes, Byrd and Ellsworth celebrated. Along the rim the Society and Sculptors full name is engraved

    Erin Frederick Springweiler (1896-1968) was born in Pforzheim, Germany and trained at the Munich Academy. During the 1830’s he worked with American sculptor Paul Manship at Havana, Cuba. He specialised in animal sculptures and his anteater can be seen at the Washington D.C. Zoological Gardens.

    The Society of Medalists was formed in the USA in 1930 to encourage the medallic work of superior sculptors. It ceased in 1995. Springweiler was selected to produce the 1941 issue, the only medal in the series to have a Polar theme.

    Springweiler wrote about his approach … “In creating this medal, I was thinking of another world, a silent and cruel one, the regions around the poles of our globe, the endless ice-wastes, the land of midnight sun”

    Polar Celebratory Medal by Springweiler

    $260.00

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