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Curiosities

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  • Some Songs of the South Pole  [From Operation Deep Freeze] – Edward Bacon

    Some Songs of the South Pole [From Operation Deep Freeze] – Edward Bacon

    Published privately, first and only, by the author, Washington DC in 1960. Landscape presentation, 72 pages. A trifle marked to covers … still a very good copy.

    Edward Bacon participated in the US “Operation Deep Freeze I” in 1955 when the Americans established their permanent base on the Antarctic. Here he documents his cold climate experiences, songs and poetry. A really interesting companion to the “Songs of the Morning” … see our separate listing

    Curious South Polar Item from Operation Deep Freeze.

    $70.00

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  • Abel Tasman Medal – 350 Years

    Abel Tasman Medal – 350 Years

    Unlike our other example this medal is silent about its purpose. However, it was issued to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the discovery of Tasmania by Abel Tasman. We think also sponsored by the Trust Bank of Tasmania.

    40 mm diameter, 25 gm, intricately engraved, in heavy relief, with an image of Tasman performing some nautical calculations and his vessels on one side with leaf design on reverse.

    Tasman celebrated with a nicely engraved design

    $55.00

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  • Fine Photograph – Dr David Livingstone.  J. G. Tunny, Photographer, Edinburgh Circa 1870’s.

    Fine Photograph – Dr David Livingstone. J. G. Tunny, Photographer, Edinburgh Circa 1870’s.

    Distinguished African Missionary and Explorer, Dr David Livingstone died in 1871. This photograph likely taken just before his final African adventure. He left for Zanzibar in 1866, part of his objective to find the source of the Nile, believing it to be further south than proposed by Burton and Speke. It was in 1870 that Stanley found him with that now famous introduction “Livingstone I presume?”.

    The photographer James Good Tunny (1820-1887) was highly regarded and in business for many years. This image was reproduced likely to commemorate news of the death of Livingstone as it references 13 Maitland Street, Edinburgh and 11 Salisbury Place … the latter being Tunny’s second studio and home from 1871 to 1886.

    A very good image in carte de visite style, a trifle marked, otherwise a fine albumen print.

    Important photograph of the esteemed African Explorer, Dr David Livingstone, possibly commemorative.

    $120.00

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  • “Society of Arts” Victorian Brass Microscope with Case – c1860-70

    “Society of Arts” Victorian Brass Microscope with Case – c1860-70

    A quality fully working English brass microscope from around 1860-70.

    With the early V shaped bar for rack and pinion focus and fine adjustment knurled knob. Two objectives both multiple compounding. There is also Live Box for observing creepy crawlies. The concave mirror is in very good condition. The original mahogany case is a quality box, original to the instrument and in very good condition, with separate drawer for slides and bits and pieces. The case still has its original lock and its key, often long lost. The microscope is mounted on a rectangular mahogany board which slides into the case.

    Very similar to the example presented by Peter Turner FRMS to the Royal Microscopical Society catalogued as number 92 in authority Turner.

    In the early 1850’s the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce offered a prize for the design of a compact compound microscope that could sell for 3 guineas. The design, which is reflected here, was won by Robert Fields & Son of Birmingham in 1854. Due to the popularity of the design it was copied by others but often at a higher price. These copies were often unsigned as is the case here. However, the brass foot is very much in the style of Ross so we suspect it came from that maker.

    Nice 19th Century Cased Brass Microscope..

    $590.00

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  • Australian Mammals – Trade Cards over 100 Years Old

    Australian Mammals – Trade Cards over 100 Years Old

    A group of six brightly coloured trade cards by Liebig advertising their delightful food products. Printed and issued from 1904-1910.

    Six delightful card chromolithographs of 1 the dingo and spotted quoll 2. the echidna and the Tasmanian devil 3. The wombat and the Tasmanian tiger (Buidelwolf) 4. The sea elephant and sea lion 5. Fruit bats looking for fruit 6 the kangaroo rat and the wallaby. 0cms x 7.3cms.

    Price $80.00 the group

    A nice early set of mammals with the desired no longer living Tasmanian Tiger

    $80.00

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  • The Pagan Trinity – Beatrice Irwin – First Edition 1912 – Presentation Copy to “Cheiro”

    The Pagan Trinity – Beatrice Irwin – First Edition 1912 – Presentation Copy to “Cheiro”

    An unusual book of poetry dedicated to French artist sculptor Auguste Rodin. The opening poem inspired by Rodin…” The Hand of God”

    Presentation copy inscribed boldly “To Count Louis Hamon with best regards from Beatrice Irwin Feb 15 /12” … the recipient was also known as Cheiro, a famous cheiromancer (palmist) and author of sought after works on that subject.

    A first edition published by John Lane, The Bodley Head, London in 1912. Octavo, 144 pages half vellum binding with nice marbled paper covered boards, top edge gilt. A nice copy with the super dedication.

    A volume of mystical verse reflecting the poet / actress’s interest in colour – music – poetry relationships, then very fashionable in Europe, America, and Russia through the works of Alexander Scriabin. Irwin Beatrice also know as Lady Rosslyn a spiritualist and followed of the Baha’i faith. Virginia Woolf described the style as neo-Paganism and of significance. Her theatrical career was extensive and included a season in Australia in 1907 when she played in Brewster’s Millions in Sydney and Melbourne. Her views on colour were sophisticated and well known … she influenced Australian artists in that regard including Roy de Maistre.

    The book is arranged in under the following descriptions … Plastic poems; Colour poems; Tone Poems; The Music of Japan and Songs of the Elements. We like it.

    Cheiro, or Count Hamon was born William John Warner in Ireland in 1866. He became an internationally renown clairvoyant, palmist, numerologist … anything occult. He read for so many of the famous including Mark Twain, Sarah Bernhardt, Eddison etc. To read about some of his predictions will surprise. It is no surprise however that he had a connection with the mystical Beatrice Irwin.

    Mystical poetry by the colourful Beatrice Irwin – Cheiro’s copy nicely inscribed.

    $160.00

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